RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Age in Place Easier

August 2, 2017 1:30 am

If you hope to age in your home, you’re not alone. Aging in place is becoming increasingly popular, as many Americans choose to live in their own spaces longer. However, if you hope to age in your home, or you’re helping a loved one age in theirs, you may need to do a remodel. The most common space that needs revamping is the bathroom. Below are a handful of tips from Gold Medal Service for redesigning your bathroom in an age-friendly style.

Things homeowners can do to adapt their bathrooms so it is safer for anyone with limited mobility to use include:

Remodel the bathroom on the main floor. If you have a house with multiple levels, consider remodeling the bathroom which is located on the same level as the bedroom of the physically impaired person who will be using it. Having to climb stairs every time they need to use the bathroom is challenging for individuals with limited mobility, and presents an increased risk.

Provide extra space in the bathroom. Make sure there is enough room in the bathroom to move a wheelchair around. Plan for extended periods of time when the physically-impaired person will need a wheelchair, a walking frame or cane, with doorways set to at least 32 inches wide. And ensure that there is enough space to position a wheelchair next to the toilet, bath or shower, to enable a safe and easy transfer.

Stick with non-slip floors. Non-slip tiles are a must to prevent slipping and tripping on the bathroom floor. Loose rugs can be hazardous so stick with non-slip materials.

Make tubs and showers more accessible. Consider a customized bath wet area. Walk-in tubs are a great solution for the physically impaired, and older bath tubs can easily be replaced with a walk-in bathtub. Consider having a seating area in the shower so an individual does not have to remain standing the entire time while showering. And be sure that the tub and shower surfaces are non-slip as well.

Add grab bars. Using towel rails as grab bars is a major safety risk as they will not support a person. Instead, install grab bars following manufacturer's instructions carefully. Having grab bars next to the bath, shower and toilet are critical to help support someone when they move around the bathroom.

Mind the lighting. Make sure you have ample lighting in the bathroom with a minimal amount of glare.

Remember an elevated toilet seat. People with mobility impairments often find it difficult to stand up from a low-set toilet. Adapting to an elevated toilet seat is helpful and reduces the stress of sitting and standing. Wheelchair users will also find that a wide toilet seat is beneficial, as they can then rely on a lateral sliding transfer to move from the wheelchair to the toilet seat and back.

Consider extra accessories. Properly locating things like soap dishes, shaving stands and shower caddies will make using the bathroom more convenient and safe. Having your professional bathroom installer advise you on where to install accessories will eliminate the need to stretch or reach for soap or shaving cream, minimizing the risk of falling.

Use low-maintenance materials. When you remodel your bathroom, consider using modern materials that are easy to clean, are mildew-resistant, and have a lifetime guarantee. There are many available options for colors, patterns, and styles.

Source: Gold Medal Service

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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A Guide to CEO Activism

August 2, 2017 1:30 am

Are you a CEO considering taking a stance as an activist? CEOs speaking out on hotly debated current issues comes with both risks and rewards. Below, Weber Shandwick identified 10 strategies that CEOs and their companies should consider when approaching activism.

- Don't ignore the slippery generational slope. Millennials are moving into the next generation of leadership and they do not want their CEOs to be bystanders.

- Estimate the price of silence. Millennials are watching.

- Be fully prepared to commit time and company resources.

- Look in the mirror to make sure your organization practices what it preaches. You will be held accountable.

- Consider the channels, messages and tone of voice used when speaking out. Ensure the reasons behind the CEO's stance are clearly articulated and vetted.

- Strength in numbers such as petitions, coalitions, etc. might be a viable solution to a steady drumbeat of contentious political and social issues.

- Have a crisis preparedness plan for a potential social media firestorm.

- Expect to be asked to speak up the next time a hot button issue arises.

- Develop a thick skin and anticipate criticism.

- Establish a firm link between the issue, your company's values and its business.

Source: Weber Shandwick

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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