RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

10 Ways to Improve Your Home's Air Quality

October 1, 2014 1:31 am

With cooler weather on the horizon, homeowners everywhere are preparing with maintenance tasks in and out of the home. While working on these projects, remember to address your home’s indoor air quality, especially if you’re going to spend a lot of time inside once winter weather kicks in.

Refresh the air in your home with these 10 tips.

1. Vacuum frequently
– Vacuum carpets, rugs and upholstered furniture twice a week to eliminate airborne allergens.

2. Add houseplants – Plants naturally produce oxygen, a process which removes carbon dioxide and other pollutants in the air.

3. Clean green – Chemicals from cleaners can be released into your home and be detrimental to the health of you and your family. Swap toxic products for organic cleaning supplies or homemade, natural cleaners, such as vinegar, that are just as effective.

4. Cut cigarette smoke – Quitting is the only way to eradicate second-hand smoke pollutants, but if quitting isn’t an option, you can minimize its effects by sending smokers outside and away from windows and doors.

5. Purify your air
– Especially helpful in bedrooms, air purifiers clear the air of toxins lingering around your home. Select one based on the type of purification needed and the size of the room it will be used in.

6. Replace your HVAC filter – Furnaces and air conditioners only work well if they are properly maintained. Change out the filter regularly to keep the air circulating through these devices clean.

7. Conduct radon testing
– Every year, pick up a radon testing kit at any hardware store and test for radon, a colorless, odorless gas that can cause lung cancer.

8. Test your smoke detectors – If you don’t already, be sure you have detectors installed in every bedroom and hallway. Test the batteries frequently and heed detector warnings signaling a low battery.

9. Install carbon monoxide detectors – For maximum protection against carbon monoxide, install detectors near the kitchen and in hallways outside of bedrooms.

10. Create natural air cleansers – Instead of relying on spray fresheners or candles, diffuse pure essential oils to produce a fresh scent.

Source: Homes.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Four Medication Safety Tips for Cold and Flu Sufferers

September 30, 2014 1:31 am

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that cold and flu season will pick up this October and peak between January and March next year. Each year, Americans catch approximately 1 billion colds, and seven in 10 consumers will turn to over-the-counter (OTC) medicines to treat symptoms.

As the countdown to cold and flu season begins, the Acetaminophen Awareness Coalition (AAC) advises consumers to stay safe when recuperating by reading medicine labels carefully to avoid doubling up on medicines with acetaminophen, the most common drug ingredient in America.

Acetaminophen is found in more than 600 different medicines, including prescription and OTC pain relievers, fever reducers, sleep aids and numerous medicines for cough, cold and flu. It is safe and effective when used as directed, but there is a limit to how much can be taken in one day. Taking more than directed is an overdose and can lead to liver damage.

When treating symptoms during the upcoming cold and flu season, follow these safety guidelines:
1. Always read and follow the medicine label.
2. Know if medicines contain acetaminophen, which is in bold type or highlighted in the "active ingredients" section of OTC medicine labels and sometimes listed as "APAP" or "acetam" on prescription labels.
3. Never take two medicines that contain acetaminophen at the same time.
4. Ask your healthcare provider or a pharmacist if you have questions about dosing instructions or medicines that contain acetaminophen.
Source: AAC

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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