RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Fixed Mortgage Rates Decline

October 13, 2014 1:32 am

Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) recently released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing average fixed mortgage rates falling back near their lows for 2014.

“Fixed mortgage rates were down on a week filled with bleak forward projections from the Federal Reserve and concern over growth in Europe,” says Frank Nothaft, vice president and chief economist, Freddie Mac. “Despite gloomy vernacular from the Fed, mortgage purchase applications were up 2 percent on the week and the labor market added 248,000 jobs, beating expectations and lowering headline unemployment to 5.9 percent.”

Fixed mortgage rates average as follows:
  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 4.12 percent with an average 0.5 point for the week ending October 9, 2014, down from last week when it averaged 4.19 percent. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 4.23 percent.
  • 15-year FRM this week averaged 3.30 percent with an average 0.5 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.36 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 3.31 percent.
  • 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 3.05 percent this week with an average 0.5 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.06 percent. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 3.05 percent.
  • 1-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.42 percent this week with an average 0.4 point, unchanged from last week. At this time last year, the 1-year ARM averaged 2.64 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How Families Can Combat Seasonal Stress

October 13, 2014 1:32 am

With the relaxing days of summer long behind us, the reality of returning to our busy fall routines can be stressful. Whether it's back to a full-time job or adjusting the kids back to school, fall is often a hectic time of year that can cause stress levels to spike.

“People who cope with stress in unhealthy ways end up creating significant personal health problems and more stress for themselves,” explains author Paul Huljich, one of America’s leading stress management experts. “Returning to work after a vacation, transitioning your children to a new school, or even fighting a busier rush hour as schools reopen can all contribute to increased stress levels.”

Don't fall back into old, familiar patterns of stress this season – fight back! When dealing with children, you should focus most on limiting your child's stress levels by preparing them for what's to come. Talking with your kids and understanding what may be causing their stress is a good first step in helping them cope. You'll teach them valuable stress management tips that can be relied upon throughout their lives, and also help to decrease the stress levels in your own life.

Another good approach to cope with stress this fall is to "un-schedule.” For example, there are many fun and rewarding extracurricular activities for children, but it is equally important that kids take time to relax with unscheduled time at home or outdoors. Try to reserve at least one weekday after school that is a "free day," and stick to that schedule for the school year. Both your child and you will be much more relaxed and prepared when you allow yourselves proper downtime.

Source: Mwella Publishing

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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