RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

7 Things You Should Never Do to Your Home

January 12, 2015 1:33 am

New homeowners can be overwhelmed with the list of things they should do to their homes on a regular basis – clean the gutters and replace the furnace filters, for example. But, say the Wall St. Journal’s home advisors, there are at least seven things a homeowner should never do—and here’s why:

Don’t do your own plumbing chores—No matter how handy you think you are, leave the plumbing to the pros, experts say. The risks are high if you mess up, and homeowners may not have a good grasp on building codes and safety requirements.

Don’t do electrical work
—The same caveats apply here—and the greatest risk of all is electrocution!

Don’t be too quick to remove a wall
—It may seem like a great idea to give yourself a little extra space. But don’t do anything until you check with a contractor or an engineer to be sure the wall you want to remove is not a load-bearing wall.

Re-think a bump-out
—In the same vein, think twice about moving a wall only slightly to gain a little space. Contractors say these little bump-outs are too costly. You’ll get more bang for your buck by opening the new space on a bigger scale.

Don’t remodel too much—By the same token, give plenty of thought before you start remodeling. If you want the best return on your investment, keep remodeling costs in line with what other homes in your neighborhood are worth.

Don’t neglect your yard—Bad front yards anger the neighbors and bring down property values. Don’t be the one who doesn’t get around to cleaning up and caring for the yard.

Don’t forget not everyone loves your pets—even if the pet smells, hair and stains don’t bother you, they likely bother your guests—and they will certainly bother potential buyers, so keep the carpets clean and open the windows when you can.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Painting or Re-carpeting? Match Room Colors to Lighting

January 12, 2015 1:33 am

When it comes to most basic DIY projects—interior painting and replacing carpeting—I was surprised to learn how often folks wade in, carefully plotting color and pattern schemes with little or no attention paid to the type of light or lighting that will illuminate the 'finished product.'

To achieve the colors you really want, Sarah Cole of the Farrow & Ball paint company, Cole, advises:
  • Paint squares of primed drywall with samples of the colors you're considering, and then move them around the room during the day. Apply at least two coats.
  • Evaluate samples of carpet during different daylight conditions.
  • Most contractors won't hang lights before you paint, but you can get a color approximation by placing a bulb you'll be using in a floor or desk lamp.
  • Natural and artificial light will work together during certain times of day, especially in summer when dusk lasts a long time. So turn on artificial lights even during daylight to see what your colors will look like.
  • Glossy finishes will reflect light and change the way the color looks, whereas flat finishes are less reflective and allow colors to look truer under bright light.
  • Light-colored walls can reflect the colors of bold carpets: A bright blue rug, for instance, can cast a bluish tone on a white wall.
Homeowners also need to take into account how sunlight affects colors. Cole reminds remodelers that as the amount and angle of the sun changes, so will your colors.
  • Light in north-facing rooms is cool and bluish. So bolder colors show up better than muted colors; and lighter colors will look subdued, says Cole.
  • Lots of high-in-the-sky light in south-facing rooms brings out the best in cool and warm colors. Dark colors will look brighter; and lighter colors will virtually glow.
  • East light is warm and yellowy before noon, then turns bluer later in the day, Cole says. These are great rooms for reds, oranges and yellows.
  • While evening light in west-facing rooms is beautiful and warm, while scant morning light can produce shadows and make colors look dull.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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