RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Three Tips for Picky Eaters

December 1, 2014 1:17 am

(Family Features) When it comes to promoting a healthy diet, it can be difficult to convince children to eat their fruits and vegetables. The last thing you want to do is spend quality family time persuading picky eaters to complete a nutritious meal. Get kids excited about adding vegetables to their favorite dinner meals with these tips.

1. Spark interest by getting kids involved. It's easy to get kids more engaged in mealtime by including them while you're preparing and cooking family meals. Teach kids how to measure out herbs and spices, or have them pick out their favorite vegetable to serve with dinner.

2. Embrace variety to keep dinnertime boredom from creeping in. Just like adults, kids can become bored with the same old rotation of veggies every week. Don’t be afraid to branch out from the basics; many grocery stores now carry produce once deemed too ‘exotic’ for their shelves, and most children won’t know the difference.

3. Introduce new foods slowly, pairing them on the table with familiar foods. It can be difficult to get little ones to try new foods -- especially fruits and veggies, so introduce foods slowly. Add in new flavors and tastes alongside their favorite dishes. Try serving your family's favorite dips, salsa or hummus with veggies to get them more willing to expand their taste preferences.

Starting at a young age will help kids establish healthy, well-rounded eating habits to last a lifetime. There's no better time than dinnertime to start modeling smart behaviors for them to follow.

Source: Birds Eye

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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What Students and First-timers Need to Know about Renting

December 1, 2014 1:17 am

I recently heard a nightmare rental horror story from a friend whose son recently moved to Boston for college, and was forced to find his own place in a short period of time when on-campus options dried up.

So I went looking for advice for student and first-time renters and developed some great source material offered through the California College of the Arts (cca.edu), which posts the most common mistakes that haunt most first-time renters. Among those mistakes are:

Underestimating monthly expenses - When renting an apartment for the first time, it’s easy to forget to include rent in your monthly budget. (General rule of thumb is to allot one third of your monthly budget to rent.)

Depending on where you rent, gas and electricity, cable television, Internet access, and a phone line are standard items to include in your budget. Also consider the cost to commute to the college via public transportation - if you drive factor bridge tolls, gas, and parking, and remember to include food, entertainment, and school supply expenses, too.

Renting in a less-than-desirable neighborhood - The quality or appearance of your apartment is far less important than feeling safe. Good rent often means having undesirable compensatory factors when apartment hunting.

Bypassing the new roommate interview(s) - A best friend is not always a best roommate. Think about your lifestyle and what you want and need in your living space. Before you commit to live with a potential roommate, identify your needs.

Many friendships have ended because of different expectations within the apartment regarding cleanliness, noise from guests, and judgments about acceptable drug/alcohol use.

Agreeing on what you want and need in your living space is not the only factor to take into consideration when thinking about moving in with a friend; you must also consider if the friend is reliable enough to keep up paying rent and bills on time.

Our next report will provide even more advice to help avoid the most common issues that affect student or first-time renters.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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