RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Tips to Keep Household Tools in Tip-top Shape

December 8, 2014 2:09 am

(BPT) - From painting supplies to gardening and handheld tools, buying well-made home improvement tools can have an impact on project results. The tools you use may be an investment, so you'll want to take care of them to ensure they last for more than just one project.

Painting tools – Painting is the easiest and most cost-effective way to transform a space or revive an outdated piece of furniture. It's important to clean paint brushes and reusable rollers immediately after use. A mixture of warm water and mild soap suds is the best cleaning solution for latex- or water-based paints. When cleaning oil-based paints, varnishes, lacquers and shellacs, closely follow the manufacturer's instructions to select the proper cleaning solvent, such as paint thinner or denatured alcohol. Consider using one set of synthetic brushes or rollers for oil-based products and another set for latex products.

Avoid soaking paint brushes in solvent or water as this can damage the bristles. A paint brush comb is an easy way to keep your brushes in tip-top shape after cleaning. For best results, comb both the edge and center of the brush to prevent paint buildup during use and extend the life of any brush.

It's also important to hang brushes when storing them; never store a paint brush on its tip, which can result in "curling." After washing used roller covers, string them on rope or dowels to aid in drying. To ensure a nice, smooth finish the next time you have to paint, don't stand the paint roller on its end or lay it down.

Gardening tools – After a day spent doing yard work, it's important to clean off any shovels, hoes or rakes. Moist soil on metal surfaces can result in rust, so hose off tools and towel dry them after each use. Use a wire brush or wire-steel pad attached to a power drill to remove rust or other debris from metal tool parts. Make the most of your storage space or garage and hang garden tools by their handles to prevent damage and avoid clutter.

Store smaller garden tools like shears, trowels and soil scoops in a sand-filled trough. Fill a 13-inch by 15-inch plastic or galvanized container with sand to within an inch of the top, pour in 1/4 cup of motor oil and stir. Place the tools in the sand with the handles out. The sand helps the tools stay clean and sharp while the oil prevents any rust buildup. Keep the container in your garage or shed to avoid the elements.

Handheld workshop tools - Quality hammers, screw drivers, cordless drills and the like can be costly. Given enough time, rust will damage metal permanently. For rust removal on handheld tools and corroded nuts and bolts, soak them in vinegar for a few days and rinse with warm water. Another way to remove rust is to gently scrape the tool with a wire brush.

When cleaning power tools, wear heavy duty gloves and disconnect all power cords. With a toothbrush, clean around any switches that may interfere with the proper operation of the machine. If you are cleaning a chainsaw, jigsaw or similar power tool, use an air compressor to blow out any sawdust that's collected within the crevices.

A little extra time spent cleaning and storing tools after a home improvement project can keep them looking and working their best. Protect your tool investments and be the ultimate weekend warrior with proper storage and organization.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The 3 Ps of Holiday Decorating

December 8, 2014 2:09 am

'Tis the season to transform family living spaces with holiday lights, trees, candles, poinsettias and more. To help minimize the risks from accidents associated with this cherished time of year, keep in mind the “3 Ps of holiday decorating,” recommended by the Hanover Insurance Group – prepare, prevent and protect.

Prepare
  • First and foremost, be sure you have working smoke alarms on every level of your home. Ideally the alarms should be interconnected so when one sounds, they all sound.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher nearby so you are prepared for a quick response to potential sparks or flames from lights, candles and fireplaces.
  • Establish a home fire escape drill that includes two ways out of every room and an outside meeting place.
Prevent
  • Use caution when climbing on ladders to hang lights and decorations. Thousands of people are treated at emergency rooms each year for falls associated with holiday decorating. Be sure someone else is home to assist if something goes wrong.
  • Do not connect more than three light strands together. Turn off all holiday lights and decorations when you are not home or when you are asleep. One in three Christmas tree fires is due to an electrical failure.
  • If you are lighting candles, and especially candles that must burn continuously, such as a menorah, place them on a tall, sturdy surface like a kitchen counter with a piece of aluminum foil underneath to catch wax drippings or a falling candle. If you must leave a candle unattended, consider placing it in a kitchen sink to minimize risks. Candle fires cause 45 percent of holiday decoration fires.
  • Be careful where you place your Christmas tree. One in six tree fires are started when a tree is too close to a heat source. Also, make sure your tree does not block an exit.
  • Be sure to use non-flammable or flame resistant decorations.
Protect
  • Check with your independent insurance agent to ensure your home is adequately covered in the event of a loss. Most experts recommend a policy with a guaranteed replacement cost provision so you can rebuild to the same quality, regardless of rising material or labor costs.
  • Some insurance policies cover the cost to recharge or replace a fire extinguisher used to fight a fire in a covered home, with no deductible. This is helpful if you have used your fire extinguisher and want to be sure it is still fully charged.
  • Consider an umbrella policy if you plan to host holiday parties in your festively decorated home. Umbrella policies may extend your policy's liability limits, generally by $1 million to $5 million, in the event you are sued by a guest.
"Holiday decorating is one of the best ways to create a festive atmosphere," said Richard W. Lavey, president, Personal Lines at Hanover. "However, some holiday decorations and the task of decorating a home can pose risks and lead to losses and injuries. Fortunately, if you prepare, prevent and protect, you will be more likely to safely enjoy the season in peace."

Source: Hanover Insurance Group

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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