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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

10 Tips for Parents on Halloween Night

October 29, 2014 1:03 am

Halloween is a night filled with candy, costumes, a bit of fear and a lot of fun, but it can also be a dangerous night if you don't take the proper safety precautions. With ghosts, goblins, vampires and zombies roaming the streets, it's important that parents and children review safety protocols before trick-or-treating.

"Halloween is a magical evening where kids get to transform into anything they want to be," said Allstate's Executive Vice President of Product Operations Steve Sorenson. "But it's most important for them to be safe. By following a few basic safety tips, everyone can do their part to make the holiday a memorable occasion for all the right reasons."

Parents should take the following steps to ensure safety.
1. Review all appropriate pedestrian and traffic safety rules with children.
2. Make sure costumes, wigs and accessories are fire-resistant.
3. Fasten reflective tape to costumes and bags to make sure they are visible if children are out after dusk.
4. Make certain that masks have large eye holes and nose and mouth openings. Parents should encourage children to remove their masks before crossing the street.
5. Provide well-fitting costumes and shoes to avoid trips and falls.
6. Make certain that swords and other accessories are made from cardboard or flexible materials. Children should not carry sharp objects.
7. Travel only in familiar, well-lit areas and avoid trick-or-treating alone.
8. Carry flashlights with fresh batteries to help children and motorists see more clearly.
9. Look both ways before crossing the street and use established crosswalks whenever possible.
10. Walk on sidewalks and not in the street. If there are no sidewalks, walk on the far edge of the road facing traffic.
Source: The Allstate Corporation

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Build a Social Kitchen

October 29, 2014 1:03 am

Today’s kitchens are built for entertaining, digital networks and cooking, but creating one that meets all of these needs can be a challenge.

A recent survey conducted by Consumer Reports asked more than 1,000 Americans what activities they do in the kitchen at least once in a typical week and found that uses for the kitchen go beyond meal prep. Nearly half entertain regularly in the kitchen, 58 percent go online (think FaceTime and recipe downloads), and 61 percent use the space to do homework or other paperwork.

Design your very own social kitchen with these suggestions:
  • Open up the space – with care. Be judicious when eliminating barriers. Using half-walls or arched openings can create a sense of openness while maintaining traffic flow. Color can be a great connector between the kitchen and the larger living or dining room area.
  • Bring back the eat-in kitchen. Built-in banquettes are making a comeback. Casual dining is integral to the social kitchen, and it’s good for resale value. It’s also a place to do the bills or help with the homework and its base can provide additional storage.
  • Add an island. This central counter will give people a place to sit while the cook prepares the meal. Just don’t let it clog traffic – there should be 42 to 48 inches of clearance on all sides.
  • Build in charging stations. For many people, the kitchen is where their electronic devices live. Charging stations can be tucked into a cabinet or drawer that’s fitted with docks and electrical outlets.
Source: Consumer Reports

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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