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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Five Secrets to Savings This Holiday Season

November 4, 2014 1:51 am

With holidays often an expensive time for families, spenders should remain vigilant when shopping for gifts and household essentials. To score maximum savings, experts recommend shopping at specific times to take advantage of big sales or online bargains.

1. Beat Black Friday deals. The best way to score holiday bargains might be to wait for Cyber Monday. Last year, the biggest markdowns were on that day, followed by Thanksgiving (the biggest day for coupons), and Black Friday. Look for sales on electronics, but also expect more door busters in other categories, including clothing, home goods, and health and beauty items.

2. Buy groceries on Wednesday nights. Grocery stores often start their new sales on Wednesdays but may still honor the previous week’s deals. Many stores also get their deliveries on Mondays and Tuesdays, so shoppers should find a good selection. And shopping later in the day means that you might get extra markdowns on bakery items, meat, produce, and other perishables.

3. Scope holiday bargains. To maximize savings, shoppers should plan their holiday shopping in advance. A good first step is to sneak a peek at sales on websites such as blackfriday.com, blackfriday.gottadeal.com, cybermonday.com, and cybermonday2014.com.

4. Wait to buy. It can pay to hold off on buying toys and winter items, such as ski jackets and sleds, until the last minute because they tend to be cheaper right before the holidays. However, those who have a wish-list toy, or need a certain color and size, should not wait. Just choose a retailer that will issue a refund if the price drops.

5. Get gift cards for less. No present is easier than a gift card, especially those looking for a last-minute solution. But if they plan ahead, shoppers can buy gift cards for less at warehouse clubs like BJ’s, Costco and Sam’s Club.

Source: Consumer Reports

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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What You Need to Know about Indoor Allergens

November 4, 2014 1:51 am

Fall is ragweed season, which causes misery for millions of people who are allergic to its pollen. In fact, ragweed is considered to be the most significant allergy trigger in the fall, though there are other plants that also release pollen during this time of year. Depending on where a person lives, ragweed pollen may be present up to and through November.

Mold is another common outdoor allergen during the fall. Piles of damp leaves or other organic material make for an ideal place for mold to grow and release spores into the air.

“For those who experience allergies all year long, they should also consider possible indoor allergens that they may be exposed to on a regular basis,” said Joseph Frasca, Senior Vice President of Marketing at EMSL Analytical, Inc. “Common indoor contaminants include mold, dust mites, pet dander, latex, insect and rodent allergens. Families should take corrective actions to minimize their exposure or to eliminate the source of the allergen from their home.”

These air quality contaminants can be a concern to people spending time both outdoors and indoors, as these allergens can enter homes and buildings through open doors and windows, on people’s clothes and through air intakes in HVAC systems. For some people, these same airborne allergens could even trigger an asthma attack.

When people who are allergic to these substances come into contact with them, their immune system releases antibodies that attack the allergens. Histamines are released into the body and trigger the allergic reactions common to so many people. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that, “Allergies are the 6th leading cause of chronic illness in the U.S. with an annual cost in excess of $18 billion. More than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies each year.”

Source: EMSL Analytical

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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