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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Best Ways to Stay Healthy when Flying

November 7, 2014 2:00 am

Ebola cropping up on American shores has spawned a wave of fear and concern. But as health experts remind us, the dread disease can only be spread through direct contact with the bodily fluids of someone who is symptomatic. As such, Ebola need not be of great concern to the average airline traveler.

But picking up cold and flu germs on an airplane is a commonplace complaint.  Yahoo! Travel experts provide these tips for staying healthy when you fly:

Wipe your seat with antibacterial wipes – Bacteria hides, and chances are the flight crew did little more before you boarded than get rid of the trash from the last flight. Ignore the funny looks you get and use those wipes on your seat, arm rests, and backrest.

Stay hydrated – Drinking plenty of fluids in-flight helps prevent a chain reaction that leaves you prone to catching something nasty in the very dry air on planes.

Don’t trust the restroom water – Not even to wash your hands. Planes fill up their water tanks wherever they are serviced, and since you don’t know where that might have been, stick to antibacterial wipes and bottled drinking water.

Use only packaged blankets and pillows – Who knows what germs might be lingering in blankets and pillows used by previous passengers? Those that have been laundered are wrapped in plastic, so if the ones you are offered are not wrapped, use your sweater or jacket instead.

Get your travel shots well in advance – It takes seven to 10 days for a shot – whether it’s a simple flu shot or a hepatitis A vaccine for third world travel – to build immunity. Don’t wait till the last minute to be inoculated.

Don’t touch – The more surfaces you touch on a plane, the more likely you will pick up germs. Keep your hands to yourself – or invest in some thin cotton gloves.

Think about wearing a surgical mask – If you’re not in Asia, this could be a tough sell, but wearing one could dramatically reduce your chances of picking up germs from the passenger next to or around you.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Five Ways a Power Outage Can Cost You Money

November 7, 2014 2:00 am

Despite increases in their frequency and severity, many people who have never experienced a power outage still view outages as merely inconvenient. But they are more than inconvenient; they leave homeowners unable to live life as normal. Research shows that in any given month millions of Americans could be without power, with or without a major storm.

Beyond disrupting everyday life, a power outage lasting just a day or two could cost a homeowner several thousand dollars.

Extended power outages can impact your checkbook in many ways:

Lost refrigerated and frozen goods. The USDA recommends throwing away refrigerated foods stored for more than two hours at over 40 degrees Fahrenheit, because refrigerators and freezers can't stay cold without electricity. For a family with a full-stocked freezer and fridge, that means a loss of at least $200 in tossed food.

Damage to your home.
Without power, sump pumps can't run, putting homes at risk for flooding, and fans and dehumidifiers can't operate to help dry out a wet basement. A power outage during a severe storm can destroy basements and pose significant hazards to homeowners. Basic costs to pump out and thoroughly dry a basement lightly flooded with clean water can start between $500-$1,500 and increase to $2,000-$10,000. But a flooded basement can be prevented, even during the most severe storms, with a home backup generator.

Expenses from staying at a hotel or eating out. If you don't have heat or running water, you might have to move the family into a hotel for a night or two. Add restaurant tabs to that and you've lost another couple hundred dollars.

Additional costs for short-term goods. If you choose to remain in your home, you will need to invest in batteries for radios and flashlights, coolers to store food, and ice to keep that food cold. Incidental costs can range from $200 to $500.

Loss of income. Depending upon the impact on your home and family, you might have to spend a few days away from work. If you work from home, you stand to potentially lose your entire income during a power outage.

Having an automatic home backup power system can help to avoid these costs, and other costs, related to power outages.

A few essential precautions you should take in preparation for severe weather is to stock up on items, like food and water, and make necessary fixes, like boarding windows. Listen to a NOAA battery-operated weather radio for critical information from the National Weather Service. Also, avoid using electrical equipment and telephones. You should use battery powered TVs and radios instead.

Source: www.generac.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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