RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Why Your Garage Door Color Matters

December 30, 2014 2:57 am

I have provided loads of information about your home's front door in our previous two reports, and today, we'll touch on one final and related subject - your garage doors. We recently became familiar with color designer, forecaster and renowned color consultant Kate Smith.

Smith's recent blog at sensationalcolor.com noted that the biggest mistake she sees homeowners making is using color to draw too much attention to their garage doors rather than downplaying them.

This is even more pronounced on a home with a protruding garage that already dominates the view of the home. The following points represent Smith's DO’s and DON’Ts for painting garage doors:
DO paint the garage doors in the same color as the house itself and not the trim color or white (unless white is your house color) if you want to keep them from standing out. Painting the garage doors the same colors as the body of the house may also make a home appear larger.

DO paint the trim around the doors either to match the door or to match the trim on the rest of your home. Usually it looks best if it is the same as on the rest of your home but there are times when it may look better to not call attention to the trim with a contrasting color.

DON’T paint the garage doors in the same accent color as the front door or shutters. This usually draws too much attention to the garage doors and chops up the facade of the home.

DON’T highlight the details of a standard garage door by painting the door in more than one color. There are historic or special doors where this may be appropriate but for the majority of garage doors this is not the way to go.
If your home is brick, Smith suggests finding a color that blends with the color of the brick. And finally, Smith says homeowners can draw attention away from the garage with lighting, colorful plants and flowers, or an interesting bench or other tasteful visual element near the front doorway.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Why You Need a Real Estate Attorney

December 30, 2014 2:57 am

I recently ran across a great post by Jeff Zane - a practicing real estate attorney in West Palm Beach, Fla., and a member of the Palm Beach County Attorneys’ Real Estate Council.

The item served as a good refresher for anyone who thinks they can save money during a real estate transaction by foregoing the involvement of legal counsel.

According to Zane, a buyer or seller should actually engage legal counsel early-on. He says the earlier in the process you involve an attorney, the more value you gain by their representation and support your interests.

Zane says a real estate attorney protect clients from potential problems that can range from the merely annoying to very costly by reviewing all written communications and contracts. Your real estate attorney reviews everything that requires your signature, including binding agreements and sales contracts.

Zane says an attorney's primary concern is that these contracts contain provisions and contingencies that benefit and protect you, and negotiating any changes to that end. An attorney can eliminate vague or unenforceable terms, and draft documents that require funds to be put aside in case the parties don't live up to their agreements.

Once you have found a home and agreed upon a selling price, Zane says a thorough search of the property’s title must be completed to ensure there are no liens or other outstanding judgments against the property, such as back taxes, lost or forged deeds, claims of undisclosed heirs or simple clerical errors.

A good real estate attorney will evaluate the status of one's title and pursue appropriate legal remedies to clear any title defects; advise you on what your title insurance policy does and does not protect against; and emphasizing marketability of the title when you sell.

If the title company does not uncover an existing lien, the insurance is there to cover it. Your attorney should also interpret and counsel you about all legal documents related to the title and transaction, including deeds, mortgages and closing statements.

In our next segment, we'll continue reviewing why a real estate attorney is a good investment.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: