RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Winter Home Safety Tips

February 23, 2015 12:06 am

(BPT) – Because freezing temperatures and snowfall continue to impact much of the country this winter, homeowners must ensure their property stays safe throughout the season and beyond. Note these safety measures to protect against:

Power Outages
Install back-up generators to power all of your home's critical systems including sump pumps, security and fire alarm systems and heating systems.

Fire Damage
While fire presents a year-round risk, certain causes of fire occur more frequently during the winter. Approximately 25,000 residential fires begin in a fireplace or chimney every year, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Boilers and furnaces pose particularly high risks as well.

These fires are caused by a layer of unburned carbon-based residues (sometimes referred to as fireplace creosote) that builds up along the inside walls of your chimney and can eventually catch fire. The solution is to have a trusted, certified professional chimney sweep inspect your chimney annually and have it cleaned as necessary.

While home fires make headlines, water damage is also common and often just as severe. The most frequent cause is faulty or broken pipes. Be sure to insulate exposed pipes to prevent freezing or bursting.

Frozen Pipes

Whether you leave your home for warmer climates or spend a weekend on the ski slopes, always leave the heat on in your home with the thermostat set to at least 55 degrees. Don't let high fuel prices tempt you into going lower.

The pipes that come in through your foundation or run through external walls can reach temperatures much lower than the setting on your thermostat, so have someone check on your home periodically while you are away.

A foolproof way to protect your home from broken or leaking pipes at any time of year is to install an automatic water shutoff system. Attached to your home's main water supply line, these devices detect leaks as they happen and automatically shut-off the water to the home, thereby preventing further ongoing damage. Additionally, these devices can be integrated into a home's security or smart-house system to provide real-time notification when the shut-off valve has activated.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Creating the Ultimate Time-Saving Kitchen

February 20, 2015 2:00 am

Five to 10 minutes may not seem like much, but it can add up quickly when cooking a weeknight meal. According to a recent survey by Consumer Reports, the average difference between actual time spent in the kitchen and what respondents desired is eight minutes.

With that goal in mind, create the ultimate time-saving kitchen with these expert tips from chefs, designers, organizers and more.
1. Design for efficiency. The work triangle – connecting the sink, fridge, and cooktop – is still the baseline for maximum efficiency. But in two-cook kitchens, it often makes sense to have a second triangle, possibly designated around an island counter with a prep sink.

2. Think ahead. One of the top cooking gripes in Consumer Reports’ survey was that it takes too much time to plan. A slow cooker is handy for make-ahead meals. Most have nonstick interiors that help with cleanup, saving you even more time after the meal.

3. Minimize maintenance. Some materials and finishes are harder to care for than others. Stainless-steel appliances remain popular, but if fingerprints are a concern, consider installing a model with a smudge-resistant finish. As for flooring, vinyl held up best in Consumer Reports tests against scratches and dents.

4. Contain the clutter. In the kitchen, try to store things close at hand. For example, dishes and flatware should be kept in a cabinet next to the dishwasher; cutting boards and sharp knives belong near the food prep counter. Creating a separate landing spot, ideally just off the kitchen or along its perimeter, for mail, school papers and the like will help keep counters clear.

5. Make it a family affair. Look for ways to enlist other members of the household. If kids are present, designate a lower cabinet for everyday dishes or flatware, allowing young ones to help set the table.
Source: Consumer Reports

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: