RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Protect Your Home from Increased Fire Risk over the Holidays

December 3, 2014 12:03 am

(Family Features) As the holiday season approaches, the risk of house fires increases drastically as cooking, decorating and other traditions require the use of candles and open flames. The U.S. Fire Administration reports there are approximately 128,700 fires during the month of December, a sharp uptick that compromises the safety of your family and your home.

Stay safe this holiday season with these tips:
  • Make sure your tree is at least three feet away from heat sources such as fireplaces, radiators, space heaters, candles or heat vents. If you have a live tree in your home, keep it well watered and remove it after the holiday or when it becomes dry.
  • Inspect holiday lights each year for frayed wires, bare spots and excessive kinking or wear before use. Connect strings of lights to an extension cord before plugging the cord into the outlet.
  • Consider using battery-operated, flameless candles. When using lit candles, make sure they are in stable holders and placed where they cannot be knocked down easily. Never leave lit candles unattended.
  • When cooking, stand by your stove and turn pot handles toward the back of the stove so children cannot reach them. Wear short sleeves or roll up long sleeves, and keep a pan lid or cookie sheet nearby to cover the pan if it catches on fire.
  • Make sure your home is equipped with working smoke alarms and fire extinguishers. The holiday season is a great time to change the batteries in your smoke alarms and to check fire extinguishers.
Source: Shriners Hospitals for Children

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Four Better Ways to Cut Home Insurance Costs

December 3, 2014 12:03 am

While there are many smart ways to save money on homeowners insurance, there are also mistakes that can result in a highly detrimental lack of coverage.

“Asking about available discounts and comparison shopping is an excellent way to cut insurance costs,” says Jeanne M. Salvatore, senior vice president and chief communications officer of the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.). “However, consumers who try to save money by reducing or dropping necessary coverage could be left dangerously underinsured.”

Following are the five biggest home insurance mistakes consumers can make, along with suggestions for better ways to save money:

1. Selecting an insurance company by price alone. It is important to choose a company with competitive prices, but also one that is financially sound and provides good customer service.

A better way to save: Check the financial health of a company with independent rating agencies and ask friends and family for recommendations. You should select an insurance company that will respond to your needs and handle claims fairly and efficiently.

2. Insuring a home for its real estate value rather than for the cost of rebuilding. When real estate prices go down, some homeowners may think they can reduce the amount of insurance on their home. But insurance is designed to cover the cost of rebuilding, not the sales price of the house. You should make sure that you have enough coverage to completely rebuild your home and replace your belongings.

A better way to save: Raise your deductible. An increase from $500 to $1,000 could save up to 25 percent on your premium payments.

3. Dropping flood insurance. Many homeowners are unaware they are at risk for flooding, but in fact, 25 percent of all flood losses occur in low risk areas—and damage from flooding is not covered under standard homeowners and renters insurance policies. Coverage is available from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), as well as from some private insurance companies. Keep in mind that significant snow fall in winter may cause spring related flooding to be particularly severe.

A better way to save: Before purchasing a home, check with the NFIP to determine whether the property is situated in a flood zone; if so, consider a less risky area. If you are already living in a designated flood zone, consider mitigation steps that can reduce your risk of flood damage.

4. Neglecting to buy renters insurance.
A renters insurance policy covers your possessions and additional living expenses if you have to move out due to an insured disaster, such as a fire or hurricane. Equally important, it provides liability protection in the event someone is injured in your home and decides to sue.

A better way to save: Look into multi-policy discounts. Buying several policies with the same insurer, such as renters, auto and life will generally provide savings.

Source: I.I.I.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: