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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

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Holiday Goods You Can Buy at a Thrift Store

December 5, 2014 2:06 am

It’s the time of year when we begin to worry about how much we can spend for the holidays. But good ideas from enterprising shoppers can help us bring smiles to family and friends while staying in control of the cost.

Savings.com editor Susan Yoo-Lee, whose Mommas in the House blog seeks to help Moms find where the bargains are, suggests five holiday costs you can keep way down by shopping at the local thrift store:

China, flatware, and glasses – These days, mixing patterns is not only acceptable, it’s chic. So if you need more pieces for your holiday table, check the thrift store first. You may also find that extra platter or the soup tureen you’ve always wanted.

Holiday décor – When it comes to Christmas and Hannukkah decorations, you can’t beat thrift store prices. You may find ornaments in their original packing at less than a third of original prices – as well as stockings, menorahs, and even centerpieces that need only minor refreshing.

Gifts – If you need a gift for someone who has everything, you may find answers in the thrift shop. For collectors or hobbyists, you can pick up vintage jewelry, old vinyl records, comic books, and charming little knick-knacks. Browse the aisles with an open mind and you may be surprised at what you find.

Clothing – Whether you’re looking for ugly holiday sweaters or an old-fashioned slip to wear under that new silk dress, check the thrift store for holiday duds for every member of the family. There may be no better buy than that little velveteen dress that was worn only once and outgrown.

Extra furniture – If you need extra holiday seating or a night table for the guest room, think thrift shop first. You can find great prices on vintage pieces as well as newer models still in good condition.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Three Ways to Boost Home Air Quality

December 5, 2014 2:06 am

Because most Americans spend up to 90 percent of their time indoors, the air in their home is a significant component to their overall health and wellbeing. Occasionally, indoor pollutants can accumulate to levels that pose health and comfort issues when too little outdoor air enters a home. These pollutants may include mold, bacteria, tobacco smoke, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radon, various allergens, elevated levels of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, and other potentially hazardous substances.

One approach to lowering the concentration of indoor air pollutants in a home is to increase the amount of outdoor air coming in. Outdoor air enters and leaves a house by infiltration, natural ventilation and mechanical ventilation.

With infiltration, outdoor air flows into the house through openings, joints and cracks in walls, floors and ceilings, as well as around windows and doors. Air may also move out of the house in this manner and this is known as exfiltration.

During natural ventilation, air moves through opened windows and doors. Air movement associated with infiltration and natural ventilation is caused by air temperature differences between indoors and outdoors and by the wind.

Finally, there are a number of mechanical ventilation devices, from exhaust fans that remove air from a single room, such as bathrooms and kitchens, to air handling systems that use fans and duct work to continuously remove indoor air and distribute filtered and conditioned outdoor air throughout the house. The rate at which outdoor air replaces indoor air is described as the air exchange rate. When there is little infiltration, natural ventilation, or mechanical ventilation, the air exchange rate is low and pollutant levels can rise.

Source: EMSL

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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