RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

A Home Maintenance Guide for All Seasons

January 22, 2015 12:48 am

(Family Features) Homeowners can save big on emergency repairs by completing a few home projects each season. From winter to spring and beyond, follow HomeAdvisor’s seasonal maintenance guide to avoid costly fixes throughout the year.

Winter
Refrigerator – Letting the coils behind your fridge build up with dirt and grime can decrease its efficiency and cost upwards of $300 to repair. Vacuum the coils thoroughly each winter.

Furnace – Rather than replace a neglected furnace, have it serviced to make sure it is operating safely and to its fullest capacity.
Spring
Plumbing – Small problems, such as a dripping faucet or clogged drain, can turn into big headaches if left unchecked, and repairing water damage can cost seven times more than hiring a plumber. Inspect all plumbing fixtures and call a plumber if you notice any leaks.

Roof – The average cost of replacing a roof is $7,744. Check for damage and make general repairs in the spring to extend its lifespan.
Summer
Paint – Completely repainting a home’s exterior costs an average of $3,180. Touch up your home’s exterior paint to protect against weather and insects.

Trees and shrubs – The average cost of trimming trees and shrubs is $577, but leaving them untrimmed can lead to roof damage – a far greater expense to repair.
Fall
Gutter and downspouts – Ignoring your gutters can affect the foundation of your home, leading to $4,000 or more in repair costs. To save money, clean the gutter and downspouts thoroughly each fall.

Windows and doors – Homeowners spend 40 percent on heating and air conditioning in a drafty home. Install weather stripping to prevent unwanted air from leaking into a home in winter. You’ll save long-term on utility bills.
Source: HomeAdvisor

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Pet Owners: 10 Questions to Ask Your Vet

January 22, 2015 12:48 am

Whether visiting for preventative measures or to treat an illness, your veterinarian may prescribe medication for your pet. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), it’s important to fully understand the medication to ensure your pet’s continued good health or recovery.

If medication is prescribed during your next visit, ask your veterinarian these questions.

1. Why has my pet been prescribed this medication and how long do I need to give it?
Your veterinarian can tell you what the medication is expected to do for your pet and how many days to give it.

2. How do I give the medication to my pet? Should it be given with food?

Your pet may have fewer side effects from some medications if they are taken with food. Other medications are best to give on an empty stomach.

3. How often should the medication be given and how much should I give each time? If it is a liquid, should I shake it first?
Giving the right dose at the right time of the day will help your pet get better more quickly.

4. How do I store the medication?
Some medications should be stored in a cool, dry place. Others may require refrigeration.

5. What should I do if my pet vomits or spits out the medication?
Your veterinarian may want to hear from you if your pet vomits. You may be told to stop giving the drug or to switch your pet to another drug.

6. If I forget to give the medication, should I give it as soon as I remember or wait until the next scheduled dose? What if I accidentally give too much?
Giving your pet too much of certain medications can cause serious side effects. You’ll want to know if giving too much is a cause for concern and a trip to the animal emergency room.

7. Should I finish giving all of the medication, even if my pet seems to be back to normal?
Some medications, such as antibiotics, should be given for a certain length of time, even if your pet is feeling better.

8. Could this medication interact with other medications my pet is taking?
Always tell your veterinarian what other medications your pet is taking, including prescription medications, over-the-counter medicines, and herbs or other dietary supplements. You may want to write these down and take the list with you to the vet’s office.

9. What reactions should I watch for, and what should I do if I see any side effects?
Your veterinarian can tell you if a reaction is normal or if it signals a serious problem. You may be asked to call your vet immediately if certain side effects occur.

10. When should I bring my pet back for a check-up? Will you be calling me to check on my pet’s progress, or should I call you?
Your vet may want to examine your pet or perform laboratory tests to make sure the medication is working as it should.

Source: FDA.gov

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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