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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

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Healthcare Plans: 3 Questions to Ask

December 12, 2014 2:18 am

Whether dealing with a new plan or a renewal of an existing plan, there are many factors patients should consider before taking action, including deductibles, co-pays and drug costs. Patients should also take into account which physicians and facilities are covered under their health insurance plan, and the cost for receiving treatment out-of-network so that they make informed health care decisions. Additionally, patients should make sure to ask their physicians whether they are participating in plans they are considering.

“We want to make sure Americans choose a plan that is right for them and their families in terms of cost and coverage,” says Robert Wah, MD, president of the American Medical Association (AMA). “It is very important that patients look beyond the big print, color-coded plan designations and prices of insurance plans and check the small print details before making their selections.”

The AMA urges patients to thoroughly review all aspects of the plans they are choosing in order to prevent interruptions in care and higher out-of-pocket costs. Consider the following:

1. Are your family's doctors in the plan? If not, what will you have to pay out-of-pocket for office visits or other services your doctor prescribes? Is the plan's directory of participating physicians up-to-date and accurate? Are there physicians on the list who are still accepting new patients?

2. What does the plan cover? What percentage of your health care costs will you have to cover? If so, how much and can you afford it? How much will you have to pay out-of-pocket for the medicines your family needs? Will you be able to use hospitals, labs and other facilities that are convenient to where you live or work? Does the plan provide access to a sufficient number of specialists that you need?

3. Does your primary care physician have to receive permission from the insurance company to refer you to a specialist? Does that rule include specialists you see regularly for a chronic condition? Does the insurer use penalties or incentives to induce physicians in the plan to limit referrals in any way?

Source: AMA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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First-Time Homebuyers Perplexed by Lending Process

December 12, 2014 2:18 am

First-time homebuyers report challenges with understanding the mortgage process and the options that are available to them, according to the J.D. Power 2014 U.S. Primary Mortgage Origination Satisfaction Study(SM).

“From describing what will happen during the process in terms a customer can understand to explaining the benefits of different options, loan representatives set the tone of the experience,” says Craig Martin, director of mortgage practice at J.D. Power. “A potential challenge with first-time homebuyers is that they may be afraid to appear uninformed, so they won’t admit when they are confused or don’t understand something. For a lender to truly stand out, their staff must foster relationships that promote open and honest communication.”

The study reveals that first-time homebuyers want a transparent mortgage process; 43 percent of all first-time homebuyers indicate they do not completely understand the process. A lack of experience and uncertainty about the process may influence how they first inquire about a mortgage; 48 percent chose to meet with local lenders in person for advice tailored to their specific situations.

The study also found:
  • The majority (54 percent) of first-time homebuyers indicate they don’t fully understand the different loan options available to them. Just 41 percent reported thorough explanations of the types of loans, terms, special programs, fees and options to reduce their down payments.
  • Consistent communication is another important factor in a positive borrowing experience. Customer satisfaction falls significantly when loan representatives fail to call customers back as promised.
  • The closing experience is often confusing for first-time homebuyers. Forty-four percent indicate that the closing agent did not completely explain all of the closing documents.
While many mortgage customers obtain information and updates online and by using mobile devices, the study shows that the loan representative is still a key part of the equation. Interestingly, some of the most important things lenders can do to deliver a great experience remain heavily reliant on human interaction.

Source: J.D. Power

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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