RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Time to Take the Keys from Grandpa?

December 6, 2017 1:42 am

If someone in your family is reaching their golden years, it can be frustrating—or scary—when their driving habits begin to slip. But how do you know when their driving is unsafe, and how can you monitor them without making them feel like they're losing their independence?

Consider the following tips from the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation.

- Ride along with your family member and observe his or her ability to control the vehicle, stay within the lane, drive at posted speeds, maintain a safe distance from other cars, obey traffic signals, make appropriate decisions when turning or at intersections, and park the car.

- Look for any confusion, poor judgement or indications that he or she is not focused, including getting lost, braking/accelerating for no apparent reason or forgetting where the car is parked.

- Consult with a physician who can help to identify any medical issues and support the decision to continue driving or not.

- If driving remains an option, consider having the individual enroll in a course to brush up on road rules and defensive driving techniques, or consult with a driving rehabilitation specialist who can perform complete evaluations both on and off the road to help maintain safe driving practices.

- If it's no longer safe to drive, be prepared for a frank but often emotional discussion. "Anger and sadness are often associated with the loss of driving, so let the individual express his or her thoughts, acknowledge their feelings, and respond with compassion," suggests Kelly A. Kearns, Psy.D., Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation.

- Explore transportation options. From community transport and senior resources to Uber, Lyft and other car services, there are many alternatives available.

- Create an "advanced directive for driving," which designates a trusted individual to assist if the older driver is no longer able to drive safely.

Source: Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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7 Ways to Protect Your Financial Info

December 6, 2017 1:42 am

Having someone hack your bank account or financial info can be devastating, emotionally and financially, and it can even ruin your credit for years to come. To help, the Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Securities offers the following steps to protect yourself from financial fraud:

- Use ATMs and gas pumps in well-lit, secure locations.
- Examine the card reader slot and surrounding areas to see if anything looks out of place, mismatched, or loose.
- Consider using a credit card not linked to your bank account to avoid compromising your PIN or cash flow, and to gain other consumer protections.
- Check your bank and credit card statements frequently to watch for fraudulent activity and report any unfamiliar activity immediately.
- Look for signs of an encrypted website when providing sensitive personal information such as credit card, banking information, or Social Security Numbers online; key identifiers include a website address for the website's login page that begins with "https" and a padlock icon in your browser status bar.
- Do not open links or attachments in unsolicited emails from any person or vendor you do not know.
- Give yourself a gift by ordering a free credit report from AnnualCreditReport.com.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Securities

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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