RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

The Best Time to Book a Flight

February 16, 2015 2:00 am

We all want to know: When is the best time to book a flight?

"When you buy your flight makes a huge difference," says CheapAir CEO Jeff Klee. “No one wants to find that the person sitting next to them on a flight paid $100 less for their ticket.”

After analyzing 1.5 billion air fares, CheapAir.com has determined that the best domestic fares were found booking, on average, 47 days in advance in 2014. The study found that the average savings that could be achieved from buying on the "best" day versus buying on the "worst" was $201 per ticket.

Analysis of the data revealed a general pattern that, beginning when flights open for sale 11 months in advance, fares tend to drop slowly but steadily until reaching a low point somewhere between 27 days and 114 days out.

Not surprisingly, the study revealed that travelers should make sure to buy their ticket at least 14 days in advance, or pay an average of $111 more. That amount jumps to $174 more if you buy within 7 days. It also revealed that buying a ticket too early can be costly, too. Tickets tend to be about $50 more expensive than their eventual low point when flights first open for sale.

The study found different dynamics exist for domestic and international flights, concluding that for international flights it is generally best to book earlier than the recommended window for domestic. The best time to buy cheap airline tickets to Latin America, for instance, averaged out to 96 days in advance. To Europe it was 276 days – that's about 9 months! Mexico was close at 251 days and Asia was even more extreme at 318 days.

Source: CheapAir.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Households Spend More for Time-Saving Appliances

February 16, 2015 2:00 am

Time is a precious commodity—so much so, it seems, that Americans are willing to spend a little more on faster household appliances, according to a recent Consumer Reports survey.

The survey found that about one-quarter of dishwasher, washer, and dryer owners said they’d pay extra for speedier appliances, and about one-third of that group said they would pay an extra $100 or more.

“The time savings really adds up: 15 minutes here, an hour there,” said Celia Kuperszmid Lehrman, Deputy Content Editor of Consumer Reports. “If a home was equipped with one of each type of product, consumers could save more than 2 hours per day!”

Induction ranges and cooktops are growing ever more popular, single-serve coffeemakers are crowding store shelves, and faster settings are being built into washers and dishwashers. Buyers of electronics have a different definition of fast; they want devices that stream, process, and download swiftly.

In the survey, 41 percent of respondents 44 years or younger said they would pay more for a faster washing machine than the one they have. Of the dishwasher owners willing to pay more for a faster dishwasher, 87 percent said they would pay an extra $50 or more.

Source: Consumer Reports

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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