RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

5 Ways to Disaster-Proof Your Home

May 27, 2015 12:54 am

The power of natural disasters can be overwhelming, but there are steps you can take to increase your home’s chance of survival. To reduce risk to your home, FEMA suggests these upgrades:

1. Reinforce Your Residence. Consider retrofitting options, or steps to improve your home’s protection from natural disasters, including high wind events. One of the most common types of wind damage to a structure is called “uplift,” which occurs when a roof lifts and collapses back down on the house. Fortunately, you can minimize the chances of this happening by installing straps connecting the structural members of your roof to the wall studs or columns.

Other risk reduction ideas include:

- Using shingles rated for 90+ mph wind, with a minimum of four nails per shingle;
- Ensuring windows and doors are properly shimmed and nailed into the framed opening, tying the window and door frames into the adjacent studs;
- Installing a garage door designed for higher wind speeds.

FEMA recommends consulting with a certified home inspector to determine if these are viable options for your home.

2. Fortify Your Home’s Floors. Homeowners can secure their structure to the foundation by using anchors or metal straps. Your builder should ensure there are properly installed anchor bolt connections between the plate and the foundation at least every four feet to ensure maximum fastening to the foundation.

Consult with your local building code official as well as a certified home inspector to determine the best options for you.

3. Trim and Tighten.
High velocity winds from thunderstorms and tornadoes can turn patio furniture, grills and tree branches into destructive missiles. In addition, if the area immediately surrounding your house contains trees, outbuildings, trash cans, yard debris or other materials that can be moved by the wind, your house will more likely be damaged during a storm.

All storage sheds and other outbuildings should be securely anchored, either to a permanent foundation or with straps and ground anchors. The straps and ground anchors used for manufactured homes can be used as anchoring systems for outbuildings, such as garden sheds, which are not placed on a permanent foundation. Outdoor furniture and barbecue grills can be secured by bolting them to decks or patios or by attaching them to ground anchors with cables or chains. Trees should also be trimmed so they’re at a safe distance away from your home.

4. Elevation is a Smart Renovation.
Flooding is a real risk, and elevating your home and its critical utilities can significantly reduce the risk of water damage. Elevating your home may even reduce your flood insurance premiums. Contact your local floodplain manager to learn the flood risk and elevation requirements for your residence.

5. Assure You’re Fully Insured. Take the time to review your insurance coverage. Are you adequately insured for the risks your community faces? Are you covered for wind, flood and sewer backup? Has your policy been updated to reflect the value of your home? Many homeowners find out too late that their insurance coverage has not increased with the value of their home. Contact your insurance agent to get these questions answered and ensure your home is financially protected.

Source: FEMA.gov

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Are You "Credit Invisible"?

May 26, 2015 2:54 am

A limited or nonexistent credit history can bar those seeking to own a home or obtain other loans. According to a recent Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) report, one in every 10 adults does not have any credit history with a national reporting agency. These 26 million Americans, dubbed “credit invisible” by the CFPB, face greater hurdles gaining access to credit.

What’s more, 19 million Americans have un-scored credit records due to a short credit history or reports with stale information. Black or Hispanic individuals or those living in low-income neighborhoods are more likely to be credit invisibles or un-scored Americans, the report found.

The three nationwide credit bureaus generate credit reports that track credit history, resulting in a three-digit score that can impact overall quality of life – most decisions to grant credit and set interest rates for loans are based on information contained in credit reports.

Credit histories reflect how debt has been repaid, and may contain information about mortgages, bank loans, student loans, car loans and credit card bills. Credit histories may also contain details about terms of credit, how much is owed to creditors, payment histories and court judgments or liens.

Source: CFPB

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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