RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

4 Steps to a More Organized Home

February 23, 2015 12:06 am

One mistake many would-be organizers make is trying to organize their entire household in one fell swoop. Even if your home is relatively neat, a project of that magnitude can be daunting – and lead to a serious case of burnout.

To avoid throwing in the towel early, be realistic about your goals by focusing on the areas in your home that accumulate the most clutter each week. Get started with these steps.

1. Set up a paper storage system
– Designate an area for all papers close to an entrance or centrally located room, like the kitchen. When you notice documents accumulating, take time to go through your pile, shredding any that could compromise your identity, and recycle non-sensitive information.

2. Pare down crowded closets – Your closet may store everything and anything, but that doesn’t mean it has to be filled to capacity. Many seasonal items can be reduced significantly in size by vacuum sealing, and bed linens can be stored inside pillowcases. If you’ve got a hang-up about too many hangers, note which garments haven’t been worn as you take down and hang up frequently used pieces. If they haven’t been worn in a few weeks, donate, toss or sell.

3. Donate multiples
– Many homeowners actually own multiples of common household items, such as hand towels, umbrellas and pot holders. Pay it forward by donating the multiples you can do without. A good rule of thumb: if you haven’t had a need for it in a year or more, donate it.

4. Simplify your desktop – Disorganization can happen digitally, too. If your computer’s overloaded with files, consider purging your desktop. Give priority to programs you use daily and delete other shortcuts that aren’t accessed on a regular basis. Streamline your photo collection, saving only the ones you’d keep in an album. And to really free up space, consider uninstalling programs that haven’t been opened in six months or more.

Source: RISMedia’s Housecall

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Winter Home Safety Tips

February 23, 2015 12:06 am

(BPT) – Because freezing temperatures and snowfall continue to impact much of the country this winter, homeowners must ensure their property stays safe throughout the season and beyond. Note these safety measures to protect against:

Power Outages
Install back-up generators to power all of your home's critical systems including sump pumps, security and fire alarm systems and heating systems.

Fire Damage
While fire presents a year-round risk, certain causes of fire occur more frequently during the winter. Approximately 25,000 residential fires begin in a fireplace or chimney every year, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Boilers and furnaces pose particularly high risks as well.

These fires are caused by a layer of unburned carbon-based residues (sometimes referred to as fireplace creosote) that builds up along the inside walls of your chimney and can eventually catch fire. The solution is to have a trusted, certified professional chimney sweep inspect your chimney annually and have it cleaned as necessary.

While home fires make headlines, water damage is also common and often just as severe. The most frequent cause is faulty or broken pipes. Be sure to insulate exposed pipes to prevent freezing or bursting.

Frozen Pipes

Whether you leave your home for warmer climates or spend a weekend on the ski slopes, always leave the heat on in your home with the thermostat set to at least 55 degrees. Don't let high fuel prices tempt you into going lower.

The pipes that come in through your foundation or run through external walls can reach temperatures much lower than the setting on your thermostat, so have someone check on your home periodically while you are away.

A foolproof way to protect your home from broken or leaking pipes at any time of year is to install an automatic water shutoff system. Attached to your home's main water supply line, these devices detect leaks as they happen and automatically shut-off the water to the home, thereby preventing further ongoing damage. Additionally, these devices can be integrated into a home's security or smart-house system to provide real-time notification when the shut-off valve has activated.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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