RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Quick Fixes for Common Household Glitches

November 9, 2017 1:39 am

Sometimes it seems there’s always something around the house that needs fixing – and the longer you put off doing the fixing, the more the glitches seem to multiply.

Real Simple Magazine suggests quick fixes to help keep your living space looking tip-top without tearing chunks out of your weekend:

Squeaky wood floor. The fix isn’t permanent, but for temporary relief from that annoying squeak, sprinkle a little talcum powder over the noisy area, then sweep it into the cracks between floorboards and wipe off the excess.  

Stained tub. Combine equal amounts of cream of tartar and baking soda with enough lemon juice to make a paste. Rub the mixture into the stain with your fingers or a soft cloth. Let sit for a half hour, then rinse well with water.

Stubborn sliding windows. If they’re not sliding easily, a little silicone spray lubricant (sold at hardware stores) will grease the skids. Spray it onto a rag, then wipe along the tracks.

Worn, dry cutting board. Gently warm a bottle of pure mineral oil (available at drugstores) in a bowl of hot water, then wipe the oil onto the surface with a soft cloth. Wipe off the excess four to six hours later.

Scuffed linoleum. Rubbing an eraser over it may be all you need. If not, try rubbing the spot with a little white toothpaste on a clean rag.

Water rings on wood. Someone forgot to use a coaster? Make that ring go away with an equal mix of white toothpaste and mayonnaise. Apply, then wipe off with a soft cloth. You may have to rub it for a bit for the ring to lighten considerably.

Scratched glass tabletop. Mix a small amount of water with a little white toothpaste and baking soda to make a paste. Using a clean, slightly damp cloth, rub the paste into the scratch using a tiny, circular motion. Wash it off with a clean, soft cloth.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Snow Blower Safety Tips

November 9, 2017 1:39 am

Snow blowing may be superior to shoveling in the minds of many, but as you drag your blower out of the garage this winter, please keep the following safety tips in mind, courtesy of OPEI.

Before it Snows:

Review your owner's manual. Check your owner's manual for safe handling procedures. If you lost your manual, you can look it up online (and store a copy on your computer so you have the manual available to reference in the future). Review how to operate the controls. You should be able to shut off your equipment quickly.

Check your equipment. The snow thrower should be completely powered off when you are checking it over. If you forgot to drain the fuel last winter before storing your snow thrower, drain the gas tank now. Adjust any cables. Check the auger.

Put your equipment where you can get to it easily. Move your equipment to a convenient and accessible location, so you can get to it easily when you need it.

Purchase your fuel. Often gas stations are closed after a storm. Be sure to use the correct fuel, as recommended by your equipment's manufacturer. Fill up the fuel tank outside before you start the engine and while the engine is cold. Never add fuel to a running or hot engine.

Store your fuel properly. Place fuel in a fuel container and label it with the date purchased and the ethanol content of the fuel. Fuel that is more than 30 days old can separate and cause operating problems. It's important to use fresh fuel in your snow thrower. Make sure fuel is stored safely and out of the reach of children.

Tidy the area you intend to clear with your equipment. Snow can sometimes hide objects. Doormats, hoses, balls, toys, boards, wires, and other debris should be removed from the areas you intend to clear. When run over by a snow thrower, these objects may harm the machine or people.

Plan to dress for winter weather. Locate your safety gear now, and place it in an accessible closet or location in your home. Plan to wear safety glasses, gloves and footwear that can handle cold and slippery surfaces.

Operate Safely

Never put your hands inside the auger or chute. Use a clean-out tool (or stick) to unclog snow or debris from your snow thrower. Your hands should never go inside the auger or chute.

Turn OFF your snow thrower if you need to clear a clog. If you need to remove debris or unclog snow, always turn off your snow thrower. Wait for all moving parts to come to a complete stop before clearing any clogs or debris.

Only use your snow thrower in visible conditions. Never operate the snow thrower without good visibility or light.

Aim your snow thrower with care. Never throw snow toward people or cars. Do not allow anyone to stand in front of your snow thrower. Keep children or pets away from your snow thrower when it is operating.

Use extreme caution on slopes and hills. Use caution when changing directions on slopes. Do not attempt to clear steep slopes.

Know where your cord is. If you have an electric powered snow thrower, be aware of where the power cord is at all times. Avoid tripping. Do not run over the power cord.

Keep pets and children inside. Kids and pets may love to play in the white stuff, but it's best to keep them inside your home and under supervision while you are using your snow thrower to clear a path or drive. Do not allow them to play in the snow as it is tossed out of the snow thrower's chute.

Source: OPEI

Published with permission from RISMedia.