RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Avoid Unclaimed Refunds This Tax Season

January 30, 2015 1:03 am

Toward the end of last year's tax filing deadline, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced that more than $760 million in unclaimed refunds would disappear after April 15 – so many dollar bills that, if stacked, they would reach higher than 187 Empire State Buildings! A larger portion of this missed opportunity comes from failing to claim the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).

"One in four people who qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit should be getting up to $6,143 in additional tax refunds, but they miss out because it's complicated to tell if you qualify," said David Prokupek, CEO of Jackson Hewitt®.

One-third of the EITC-eligible population changes each year based on marital, parental and financial status, and many Americans may not know they qualify for this credit. The IRS allows these individuals to catch up, offering a three-year window for filing federal tax returns.

To claim the EITC, taxpayers must be employed or self-employed and have a Social Security number. They will need to show proof of having less than $3,350 in investment income and have earned income and adjusted gross income lower than the following:



Single, Head of Household, Qualifying Widow(er)

No Children - $14,590

1 Child - $38,511

2 Children - $43,756

3 Children - $46,997



Married Filing Jointly

No Children - $20,020

1 Child - $43,941
2 Children - $49,186

3 Children - $52,427

For example, a married couple filing jointly with three children and a combined earned income of $23,000 could qualify for the maximum EITC of $6,143. If the couple overlooked the EITC the past three years, they possibly could claim thousands of dollars more for each year for a total refund approaching half their annual income.

Source: Jackson Hewitt®

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Your Vehicle: To Idle or Not to Idle

January 29, 2015 1:00 am

It’s that time of the year when many motorists let their vehicle "warm up,” or idle, before driving. Did you know that today’s cars are ready to drive in cold temperatures without excessive idling?

"Unless you are trying to defrost the windshield or warm the interior of your car, idling is not required for today's vehicles," says Rich White, Car Care Council. "In most cases, idling longer than 30 seconds is unnecessary. The best way to warm up your car's engine is to drive gently at the start. Remember, a vehicle gets zero miles per gallon when idling and the result is lower fuel economy and wasted money."

The EPA cautions that idling your car longer than 30 seconds increases air pollution, wastes fuel and siphons your gas dollars. It can also lead to engine damage and create issues with cylinders, spark plugs and the exhaust system.

The idea of idling before driving dates back to when cars were built with carburetors. With new fuel-injection technology, complex computer systems and thinner synthetic oils, drivers don't need to warm up their cars before hitting the road.

Source: Car Care Council

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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