RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

2016's Most Coveted Home Color Trends

March 16, 2015 2:09 am

Global color authority Pantone recently revealed 2016’s most coveted home color trends. The palettes expected to make the biggest splash in home design next year are:

“Natural Forms” – Unambiguous colors, including shades plumbed from natural resources such as warm rosy clay and sheepskin beige

“Dichotomy” – Combinations of silver metallics, sunny yellows and bright cobalt blues with their calmer counterparts

“Ephemera” – Pastel-focused, blending delicate shades of wan blue, pale peach and tender yellow

“Lineage” – Shades of navy, black, tan and regimental green co-mingle with touches of brighter colors

“Soft Focus” – Versatile subtle or muted colors, sometimes described as smoky

“Bijoux”
– Gleams with drama and intensity across jewel tones

“Merriment” – Joyful shades including vibrant greens and yellows contrasted with pinks and oranges

“Footloose” – Capricious color combinations with vacation destination blues and blue-greens

“Mixed Bag” – Assortment of eclectic patterns and prints with exciting and unique colors like pirate black, mandarin red, violet and florid orange

Source: International Home and Housewares Show

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Know Your Rights when You Fly

March 13, 2015 1:57 am

When weather conditions ground a plane, it creates a domino effect of cancelled flights across the country. Add in that nearly 2 million people fly each day and you could easily find that part of your travels may be spent trying to get a seat on another plane.

Legal insurance counsel ARAG® advises travelers to keep in mind their rights when flying.

Flight Delays or Cancellations
If your flight is delayed or cancelled for problems beyond anyone's control, like weather or safety issues, most airlines will rebook you on the next available flight at no charge. They may even book you with another airline without charging you extra. Airlines are not required to provide any amenities, such as meal vouchers or hotel rooms, in this situation.

Similarly, if your flight is delayed or cancelled for something the airline could control, such as a maintenance issue, the airline will likely rebook you on the next available flight, either theirs or another airline, at no charge. The airline is still not required to provide amenities; however, many will provide meal vouchers and even hotel rooms and grooming kits if your delay causes an unexpected overnight stay.

Overbooked Flights
If you are "bumped" for a domestic flight that is oversold, you are likely legally entitled to compensation for a new flight. Generally, when the flight is oversold, the airlines will ask for willing passengers to volunteer to give up their seats in exchange for a later flight and compensation. They may also negotiate with free tickets or travel vouchers.

"If you accept one of these offers," says Ann Cosimano, General Counsel for ARAG, "be sure to ask some deal-breaking questions such as when the ticket expires or if it's only available certain days of the week or during certain seasons."

If no one volunteers and you're bumped involuntarily, you should receive a written statement from the airline that describes your rights and how the carrier decided which passengers were bumped. If you're not rebooked and scheduled to arrive at your destination within one hour of your originally scheduled arrival time, then you are entitled to compensation in the form of a check or cash. The amount depends on the ticket price and length of delay. To be eligible for compensation, you must have a confirmed reservation and have checked-in with the airline within their deadlines.

If the airline must substitute a smaller plane for the one it originally planned to use, the carrier isn't required to pay people who are bumped as a result. In addition, on domestic flights using aircraft with 30 through 60 passenger seats, compensation is not required if you were bumped due to safety-related aircraft weight or balance constraints.

Tarmac Delays
"If you are delayed on the tarmac of a domestic flight before taking off or after landing, you may have rights if the delay is more than three hours," says Cosimano. DOT rules prohibit most U.S. airlines to remain on the tarmac for more than three hours unless air traffic control or the pilot decides there are reasons related to safety, security or airport operations.

If you are delayed on the tarmac of a domestic flight, you are entitled to food and water no later than two hours after the delay begins. Lavatories must remain operable and medical attention must be available if needed.

Source: ARAG®

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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