RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Protecting Loved Ones from Fake Loan Debt Collectors

April 28, 2015 2:03 am

Family of homeowners and other lessees should watch for fraudulent debt collectors, many of whom call to collect overdue payments on loans taken out by a family member or significant other. The caller, posing on behalf of a loan company, will often threaten consequences for your loved one if you do not comply with their demands.

But the majority of these overdue loans don’t exist, according to the Better Business Bureau (BBB). If a family member or significant other is in fact in debt, remitting payment to a scammer will not reduce it.

If a fake debt collector calls, take action with these steps.

Do not offer or confirm personal information. Until you have verified the call, do not provide bank account, credit card or other private information – and don’t confirm information the caller offers, either.

Ask for an official “validation notice” of debt. Legitimate debt collectors are legally required to provide, in writing, the name of the creditor, the amount of debt and a statement of your rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says the BBB.

Ask for specific identifying information. Get as much identifying information as possible, such as the name of the caller, the company he or she works for, the company’s street address and phone number, to confirm the collection agency exists.

Alert loved ones. Make sure targeted loves ones are aware that scammers have at least some of their personal information. Loved ones should also place a fraud alert on his or her credit report, says the BBB.

Monitor your credit report. Visit AnnualCreditReport.com to check (for free) for suspicious activity or overdue debt in your name. Those without access to Internet can call (877) 322-8228 to monitor their report.

File an FTC complaint. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act prohibits debt collections from being abusive, unfair or deceptive. If the debt collector threatens you or your loved ones, file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Source: BBB

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Planting on Your Property? 6 Tree Safety Tips

April 28, 2015 2:03 am

When selecting a tree to plant at home, it’s important to keep in mind the future growth of the tree, say the experts at SDG&E, a Sempra Energy utility. Note that as trees grow to mature heights, they can interfere with overhead power lines and, in some cases, underground utility lines. Before planting a new tree, follow these safety guidelines.

1. Take the time to properly select a tree that is not only aesthetically pleasing but is safe to plant in your area.

2. Keep water conservation in mind, and consider planting drought-tolerant trees and vegetation on your property.

3. Take the time to choose the planting site as carefully as you chose the tree. Remember to always plant the "Right Tree in the Right Place" for the best chance of success.

4. Call Underground Service Alert at 8-1-1 to mark out underground utility lines two days before digging. With just one call, you can have your underground cable, water and energy lines marked out for free.

5. Don't plant shrubs directly in front of utility boxes or pad-mounted (box) transformers. Allow room for doors to swing open when shrubs are fully grown. The law requires that eight feet in front of and two feet on the other three sides of the transformer must be clear.

6. Contact your city arborist, parks department or public works department to find out whether your city has guidelines for planting trees, and whether a permit is required for planting trees in parkways or public areas.

Source: Sempra Energy

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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