RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

3 Ways to Jumpstart College Savings

May 5, 2015 12:24 am

When it comes to financing a college education, saving money is easier said than done. Though 90 percent of American parents believe a college education is an important investment in their child’s future, less than half (48 percent) are actively saving, according to a recently released survey by Ipsos and lender Sallie Mae.

What’s more, those who have established a college fund are saving less than they did in past years, with the average annual amount falling to just $10,040.

Increases in the cost of living and unexpected expenses were the most commonly cited reasons for saving less.

Despite these findings, habits are changing for the better. More parents saving for college are using auto-deposit services, designating a portion of each paycheck to a college savings fund, reducing personal and household spending and using cash-back rewards programs tied to college savings accounts.

According to Sallie Mae, a little preparation can mean big savings in the long run. Parents who build a plan to save for college have saved $11,102; parents who do not have plans saved just $7,611.

To boost your saving efforts, Sallie Mae recommends the following:

1. Open a savings account. Set up and designate a savings account as your college fund. Deposit gifts from friends and family, and sign up for free services that let you earn cash back to save for college.

2. Make regular contributions. Set a goal, and create a routine of adding money. Even a little bit adds up over time, and automatic deposits make saving easy.

3. Explore tax-advantaged options. Put your money to work using dedicated college savings programs like Coverdell Education Savings Accounts, prepaid state college savings plans, and 529 college savings plans.

Source: Sallie Mae

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Reducing Portable Generator Risks

May 5, 2015 12:24 am

(Family Features) From weather-related power outages to camping or tailgating, portable generators work overtime in warmer months to provide a flexible means of electricity. When power fails, they provide reassuring light to a storm-darkened house, restore operation to power necessary equipment and allow you to operate climate control devices such as fans and space heaters.

However, portable generators are not free of risks – the greatest of which is carbon monoxide, according to the Portable Generator Manufacturers’ Association (PGMA). The engine exhaust from these devices contains this gas, which you cannot see, taste or smell and can have fatal consequences for people and animals that are exposed to excess levels. Remember to:
  • Never run a portable generator indoors or in partially-enclosed spaces like garages, porches, breezeways or tents, even if using fans or opening doors and windows for ventilation. Carbon monoxide can build up and linger for hours, even after the generator has shut off.
  • Always place a portable generator downwind and point the engine exhaust away from occupied spaces, such as a campsite or tailgate area.
  • Get to fresh air immediately and call 911 for emergency medical attention if you feel sick, dizzy or weak while using your portable generator.
  • Install a battery-operated carbon monoxide alarm according to manufacturer's instructions.
  • Always refer to the generator owner's manual for further information about safe operation and potential hazards.
By learning how to properly operate your portable generator, you and your family can safely avoid the inconvenience of power outages and enjoy hours of fun this summer and beyond.

Source: PGMA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: