RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

There Are No Zero-Risk Zones for Flooding

May 11, 2015 12:36 am

Did you know standard homeowners insurance does not cover flood risk? A separate flood policy can protect you from footing the bill for flood-related repairs. This policy is available through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), or through a few private insurance companies, according to the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.).

Recent flood insurance reforms are phasing in for areas at high risk for flooding, and flood maps are being updated to move some people into higher- or lower-risk zones. However, there are no zero-risk zones. Through the NFIP, the average cost of a policy for a homeowner, which includes coverage for both contents and the structure itself, is $700. Private excess flood insurance is also available if more coverage is needed than the maximum amount available from the NFIP.

Renters should also consider a flood policy. Most renters living in low- to moderate-risk flood zones are eligible for preferred rates, with contents-only coverage ranging from $44 to $266 a year, depending on the flood zone and amount of coverage.

Have a conversation with your insurance professional to make sure your coverage is up to date. Keep in mind that flood insurance policies through the NFIP have a 30-day waiting period before they go into effect, so do not wait for a severe weather warning to start looking into flood protection. Visit FloodSmart.gov for more information.

Source: I.I.I.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Brace Yourselves - Summer Mold is Coming

May 11, 2015 12:36 am

Mold in the home can lead to serious problems, including respiratory irritation and warm weather illnesses, says the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA). Mold spreads due to air and moisture, and if an HVAC system produces condensation or is exposed to the elements, it can become an immediate breeding ground for mold.

To nip these problems in the bud, or rather, the spore, NADCA suggests an annual HVAC inspection. During an inspection, the condition of the property is categorized on the NADCA scale as Condition1, Condition 2, or Condition 3. Condition 1 represents normal ecology within the home; Condition 2 is assigned to homes which has been contaminated with settled spores or contains traces of actual mold growth; Condition 3 denotes a home with an active or dormant presence of spores and mold growth.

After the mold has been removed, be sure to keep the humidity in your house as low as possible. This can be achieved by using air conditioners and dehumidifiers in the more humid months, as well as making sure that there is plenty of ventilation in your home. Vents or fans over stoves and other moisture-bearing appliances are also a must.

Source: NADCA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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