RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Creating the Ultimate Time-Saving Kitchen

February 20, 2015 2:00 am

Five to 10 minutes may not seem like much, but it can add up quickly when cooking a weeknight meal. According to a recent survey by Consumer Reports, the average difference between actual time spent in the kitchen and what respondents desired is eight minutes.

With that goal in mind, create the ultimate time-saving kitchen with these expert tips from chefs, designers, organizers and more.
1. Design for efficiency. The work triangle – connecting the sink, fridge, and cooktop – is still the baseline for maximum efficiency. But in two-cook kitchens, it often makes sense to have a second triangle, possibly designated around an island counter with a prep sink.

2. Think ahead. One of the top cooking gripes in Consumer Reports’ survey was that it takes too much time to plan. A slow cooker is handy for make-ahead meals. Most have nonstick interiors that help with cleanup, saving you even more time after the meal.

3. Minimize maintenance. Some materials and finishes are harder to care for than others. Stainless-steel appliances remain popular, but if fingerprints are a concern, consider installing a model with a smudge-resistant finish. As for flooring, vinyl held up best in Consumer Reports tests against scratches and dents.

4. Contain the clutter. In the kitchen, try to store things close at hand. For example, dishes and flatware should be kept in a cabinet next to the dishwasher; cutting boards and sharp knives belong near the food prep counter. Creating a separate landing spot, ideally just off the kitchen or along its perimeter, for mail, school papers and the like will help keep counters clear.

5. Make it a family affair. Look for ways to enlist other members of the household. If kids are present, designate a lower cabinet for everyday dishes or flatware, allowing young ones to help set the table.
Source: Consumer Reports

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Organizing Finances to Buy a Home

February 20, 2015 2:00 am

Buying a home is a major life decision. You’ll want to do everything in your power to make sure you’re financially secure enough to tackle the investment. If you’re planning to buy a home in the near future, organization is key.

“Buying your first home can be a complicated and intimidating process, both emotionally and financially,” said Steve Trumble, ACCC. “Buying a home is one of the largest investments consumers will ever make, and it’s critical that they prepare financially before they take the leap.”

The ACCC suggests the following:

Pay your bills on time – Your credit history plays an important role in the homebuying process. This includes rent and bills. If you have a history of paying credit cards, utilities, student loans and other bills late, it can damage your ability to secure a mortgage. Create a schedule and budget so that you can pay bills on time as they are due.

Pull your credit report – It’s critical that you know what your credit score is since it is one of the first and most important items a bank looks at when determining whether to grant a mortgage. When examining the report, make sure to look for inaccuracies or mistakes. If there are any, you’ll have to address that with the credit bureaus. If your score is lower than it should be, spend the time necessary to improve your score long before you are going to buy.

Trade lines – Most lenders prefer if you have three or more trade lines (credit cards, student loans, car loan, etc.) that have been open for at least a year. It’s also important to avoid closing these trade lines because it will negatively affect your credit score.

Save as much money as possible – A larger down payment (20 percent) or more can save you hundreds in additional insurances and give you more buying power.

Do your research – There are many other factors you have to consider when buying a home in addition to the purchase price of the house. Property taxes, homeowners insurance, utilities, maintenance, condo fees and repair can add up very quickly. Make sure to research interest rates to determine the best time to buy.

Source: ACCC

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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