RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

The 7 Most Common Tax Scams – and How to Avoid Them

February 23, 2015 12:06 am

Filing season means three things: taxes, refunds and scams. Taxpayers should know that they are legally responsible for what is on their tax returns, even if it is prepared by someone else. Illegal scams can lead to significant penalties and interest for taxpayers, as well as possible criminal prosecution.

To avoid jeopardizing your standing with the IRS, steer clear of these seven schemes.
  • Phone Scams: Aggressive and threatening phone calls by criminals impersonating IRS agents remain an ongoing threat to taxpayers. The IRS has seen a surge of these phone scams in recent months as scam artists threaten police arrest, deportation, license revocation and other things.
  • Phishing: Taxpayers need to be on guard against fake emails or websites looking to steal personal information. The IRS will not send you an email about a bill or refund out of the blue. Don’t click on one claiming to be from the IRS that takes you by surprise. Taxpayers should be wary of clicking on strange emails and websites. They may be scams to steal your personal information.
  • Identity Theft: Taxpayers need to watch out for identity theft, especially around tax time. The IRS is making progress on this front, but taxpayers still need to be extremely careful and do everything they can to avoid becoming a victim.
  • Return Preparer Fraud: Taxpayers need to be on the lookout for unscrupulous return preparers. The vast majority of tax professionals provide honest, high-quality service. But there are some dishonest preparers who set up shop each filing season to perpetrate refund fraud, identity theft and other scams that hurt taxpayers.
  • Inflated Refund Claims: Taxpayers need to be on the lookout for anyone promising inflated refunds. Taxpayers should be wary of anyone who asks them to sign a blank return, promise a big refund before looking at their records, or charge fees based on a percentage of the refund. Scam artists use flyers, advertisements, phony store fronts and word of mouth via community groups and churches in seeking victims.
  • Fake Charities: Taxpayers should be on guard against groups masquerading as charitable organizations to attract donations from unsuspecting contributors. Contributors should take a few extra minutes to ensure their hard-earned money goes to legitimate and currently eligible charities. Note charities with names that are similar to familiar or nationally-known organizations.
  • Abusive Tax Shelters: Taxpayers should avoid using abusive tax structures to avoid paying taxes. The vast majority of taxpayers pay their fair share, and everyone should be on the lookout for people peddling tax shelters that sound too good to be true. When in doubt, taxpayers should seek an independent opinion regarding complex products they are offered.
Source: IRS.gov

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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4 Steps to a More Organized Home

February 23, 2015 12:06 am

One mistake many would-be organizers make is trying to organize their entire household in one fell swoop. Even if your home is relatively neat, a project of that magnitude can be daunting – and lead to a serious case of burnout.

To avoid throwing in the towel early, be realistic about your goals by focusing on the areas in your home that accumulate the most clutter each week. Get started with these steps.

1. Set up a paper storage system
– Designate an area for all papers close to an entrance or centrally located room, like the kitchen. When you notice documents accumulating, take time to go through your pile, shredding any that could compromise your identity, and recycle non-sensitive information.

2. Pare down crowded closets – Your closet may store everything and anything, but that doesn’t mean it has to be filled to capacity. Many seasonal items can be reduced significantly in size by vacuum sealing, and bed linens can be stored inside pillowcases. If you’ve got a hang-up about too many hangers, note which garments haven’t been worn as you take down and hang up frequently used pieces. If they haven’t been worn in a few weeks, donate, toss or sell.

3. Donate multiples
– Many homeowners actually own multiples of common household items, such as hand towels, umbrellas and pot holders. Pay it forward by donating the multiples you can do without. A good rule of thumb: if you haven’t had a need for it in a year or more, donate it.

4. Simplify your desktop – Disorganization can happen digitally, too. If your computer’s overloaded with files, consider purging your desktop. Give priority to programs you use daily and delete other shortcuts that aren’t accessed on a regular basis. Streamline your photo collection, saving only the ones you’d keep in an album. And to really free up space, consider uninstalling programs that haven’t been opened in six months or more.

Source: RISMedia’s Housecall

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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