RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

The Far-Reaching Impact of Household Food Waste

June 29, 2015 2:15 am

There’s no arguing food waste is a common occurrence in homes across America. According to a recent survey by TNS Global, more than half of households in the U.S. throw out leftovers at least once a week, and a nearly equal amount throw away food they bought, but never consumed. Government figures estimate households waste $900 in unconsumed food each year.

When asked what concerns them most when wasting food, almost 80 percent of respondents cited money lost; about half were bothered by the fact that others do not have enough to eat. Less than 20 percent pointed to adverse impacts on the environment, although the EPA says wasted food is the most prevalent material in landfills and contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. The EPA also expresses concern over the wasted energy, water and other resources used to produce the 30-40 percent of food that goes uneaten in the U.S.

One way to reduce food waste is through proper packaging. Plastic packaging helps prevent food waste by providing barriers to oxygen, light, temperatures, moisture, microbes and other factors that lead to spoilage.

“Just a little bit of plastic packaging can prevent a whole lot of food waste,” says Steve Russell of the American Chemistry Council.

Though less than half of survey respondents say they actively use proper packaging at home, nearly all said they take or one or more steps to prevent food waste, such as eating leftovers and avoiding over-buying of perishables.

Source: Plastics Make It Possible

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Property Manager Preferences Differ in Renter Screenings

June 29, 2015 2:15 am

Whether evaluating an individual new to the rental market or a seasoned tenant, property managers often prioritize factors when assessing candidates. Did you know the size of a property manager’s portfolio can have an impact on those priorities?

According to a recent TransUnion survey, the number of properties one manages can impact which qualities are valued when reviewing prospective residents. Small property managers, the survey says, prefer an individual to have favorable income and employment circumstances, while large property managers mainly screen for rental and eviction history. Small property managers are defined as those managing 100 units or less. Large property managers are defined as those managing 101 or more units.

Both small and large property managers also place importance on criminal and background checks. Credit history, the survey says, is the least important factor.

Source: TransUnion

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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