RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

What Every Homebuyer Should Know about Termites

April 21, 2015 1:45 am

(BPT) - It's a cruel coincidence that spring homebuying season corresponds with another far less pleasant one - termite swarming season. When eager homebuyers emerge from winter hibernation to look for their dream homes, termites emerge, too, say the experts at the National Pest Management Association (NPMA).

If you'll be buying or selling a home this spring, the NPMA offers some valuable termite information:
  • The average homebuyer and homeowner might have difficulty spotting the evidence of a termite infestation. Termites chew through wood, flooring and other materials behind-the-scenes, so it can take years before the signs of an infestation are visible to the untrained eye. An inspection by a licensed pest professional is the best way to detect an infestation of wood-destroying organisms (WDOs) - especially if you live in a termite-prone area of the country.
  • A WDO inspection is different from a simple structural inspection. Buyers should be sure to have their prospective home inspected by a licensed pest professional. The inspection will last about an hour, and the specialist will probe the home from top to bottom to look for telltale signs of termite damage. After the inspection is over, the specialist will report to the buyers what he or she has found, and an estimate of how much it might cost to remediate any termite damage he or she has discovered.
  • Different states have varying laws about termite inspections. Some may require one before a home can be sold, while others do not. Check with your REALTOR® about the laws in your state, and keep in mind that many lenders will require a pest inspection be done in addition to a structural inspection - especially if the home you are buying is in a termite-prone area.
  • Termite detection, remediation and control are not do-it-yourself tasks. If an inspector finds signs of a termite infestation and damage, you'll need professionals to remedy the problem. Buyers who discover problems before the sale is final will be better able to negotiate with the seller to take care of the problem. In some states, the law may not allow the sale to be finalized until the damage is addressed, and lenders may refuse to finalize a mortgage for a home with unresolved termite issues.
  • If the termite inspection shows your new home is pest-free, congratulations! After the sale is finalized, be sure to take steps to protect your home from termites going forward, including having the home inspected for termites at least once every three years, and every year if you live in an area prone to termite infestations.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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7 Ways to Celebrate Earth Day with Kids

April 20, 2015 1:42 am

Each April, Earth Day acknowledges the need for continued care of our planet. To get children involved this Earth Day, host fun activities that not only celebrate the occasion, but also help increase their environmental awareness, say the experts at Smart Playrooms.

Here are 7 fun ways to celebrate with children this year:

1. Plant a Tree
Tree planting is one of the most traditional ways of celebrating Earth Day. By fostering trees, children can help reduce gas emissions from greenhouses and enable long-lasting biodiversity in their communities. This commonly practiced activity is appropriate for school-aged children, as it is incredibly impactful but fairly simple to execute.

2. Host a Garage Sale or Clothing Swap
For many people, the things they don’t want or no longer need take up a lot of space and resources. Repurposing these items for those who can use them is an earth-friendly way of reinforcing recycling and generosity. Garage sales are fairly easy to coordinate and can be done at home or even in a school setting. Children can take the time to de-clutter their spaces and find a home for their old toys and clothes.

3. Organize Your Playroom or Classroom
Getting organized around the house and in the classroom is a huge task, but is full of long-lasting benefits. Redesigning a space children play in can transform it into a room for inspiration. By using toys and furniture that already exist, convert cluttered spaces into an organized environment that far exceeds Earth Day.

4. Community Clean-Up
Assembling a group of children together to pick up trash and waste in your neighborhood is a fun way to reduce pollution. This hands-on and collective effort beautifies local neighborhoods and bonds everyone in the process. Before going into the field, be sure to review your neighborhood’s restrictions and safety guidelines to protect both children and adult volunteers. Make sure you’ve carefully delegated tasks and your clean-up route to use your time efficiently.

5. Wear Earth-Toned Colors
Having your children wear earth-toned colors like brown and green is one of the simplest ways to create awareness. Coordinate with other leaders in your community to spread the word a few days in advance.

6. Build a Birdhouse
Nature crafts are a kid-favorite. Installing birdfeeders encourages the local bird population. To create the birdhouse, used recycled materials from home like guitar strings or juice cartoons to drive home the importance of reuse. This is a project that will allow your children to express themselves creatively while benefiting our ecosystem.

7. Write a Letter
If you are a teacher, consider taking a day to have your class write a letter to your local government on ways to improve your environment. You’d be surprised what great ideas children come up with. In even better instances, your class’ idea may even come into fruition! Teaching children that they have power to make change to our environment is priceless.

Source: Smart Playrooms

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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