RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

5 Ways to Become Better Recyclers at Home

April 22, 2015 1:45 am

(Family Features) Living green isn't just about saving energy. Sustainable living also means putting earth-friendly practices in place throughout your home, including recycling. Make recycling easier for the whole family with these tips from the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC).

1. Establish collection bins to make it easy to gather all your recycling in one place. The number of bins you need depends on your city's guidelines for sorting. If no sorting is required, a single bin will do. Otherwise, use different colored bins to make it simple to sort paper, aluminum, glass, etc.

2. Most families find the kitchen is a primary source of recyclable goods. If space is at a premium, keep a smaller collection bin in the kitchen that can be easily transported to a sorting station in a larger area, such as the garage.

3. Don't forget to recycle in other rooms, too. Many common bathroom items, such as shampoo and soap bottles, and even cardboard toilet paper tubes, can be recycled.

4. Remember that recycling can also come in other forms, like donating unwanted clothing to charity or using leftover water to quench thirsty plants or freshen the dog's bowl.

5. Be sure to rinse away any food or liquid residue from containers to manage odors and keep your recycling area tidy and odor free. Maximize your bin space by compressing cans and bottles.

Source: PERC

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Plant and Maintain a Tree This Earth Day

April 22, 2015 1:45 am

Did you know that trees can die quickly if planted too far into the ground? Even trees that are well cared for are vulnerable, says the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA). Before you plant a tree this Earth Day, follow these best practices.

Measure the height and diameter of the root ball or root spread.
Dig the hole just deep enough to allow the first structural root to be at level grade. The hole’s diameter should be two to three times the diameter of the root ball or root spread.

Set the tree on undisturbed solid ground in the center of the hole.
The tree should be planted so that the root flare, the base of the tree trunk where the roots begin to flare out, is visible and above grade.

Backfill with soil from the planting hole
, using water to pack or settle the soil around the root ball. Do not tamp soil by stepping on it.

Mulch the planting area
with 2-4 inches of an organic mulch, such as wood chips. Do not mulch up to or against the trunk. Start the mulch six inches away from the tree trunk. Fertilizing is not recommended at the time of planting.

Trees should be pruned after planting
to remove only broken, damaged, diseased or dead branches.

Stake or protect the trunk of the tree
if there is a real potential for wind damage or lawn mower injury. Remove the guy wires (string, rope, wire or other used with supports) when the staking is no longer needed or the tree could be injured or even killed from girdling by the wire.

Prune to develop a good branch structure
1-3 years after planting. Never remove more than 25 percent of total foliage in one year. Depending on the tree and its condition, some arborists advocate capping pruning at even a lower percentage.

If you’re new to purchasing a tree, look for these common forms of packaged trees:
  • Bare-Root Plants may be sold with the roots tightly packed in a moisture-retaining medium that is wrapped with paper or plastic, or with roots loosely covered by a moist packing medium. Roots must be adequately moistened prior to planting. Roots are spread out evenly in the hole when planting.
  • Balled and Burlapped (B&B) Trees are moved with a ball of soil protecting their root system. Soil balls are heavy, so professional arborists who have proper equipment should be hired to plant large trees. Smaller B&B trees should be carried with a hand under the ball. Carrying a B&B tree by the stem or branches can result in serious root damage. When planting, carefully remove the top layer of soil down to the first structural root. Set the root ball in the hole, position the tree, then remove twine and nails. Remove or fold back burlap from the upper third of the root ball.
  • Container-Grown Trees have the advantage of a root system that is relatively undisturbed at planting, but beware of "pot-bound" container trees. Do not buy container trees that have a large amount of roots completely circling the inside of the pot. These trees will take a long time to get established after planting because the roots have difficulty growing beyond the thick ring of circling roots. Immediately before planting container trees, prune any circling roots. Root pruning can cut up to 50 percent of the roots in container trees while still sufficient to permit plant establishment. Always remove the container prior to planting.
Source: TCIA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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