RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

4 Mower Maintenance Tips

April 29, 2015 2:09 am

For do-it-yourself homeowners, your lawnmower is likely the workhorse of your outdoor maintenance routine. Performing an annual engine tune-up will ensure your mower lasts all season long. Here’s how to get started, from the experts at Briggs & Stratton.

1. Change the mower oil, a task made easier than ever with an oil removal kit. With a kit, you no longer need to tip your mower over to drain the oil, making for a mess-free oil change.

2. Replace the air filter and spark plug at the beginning of each season. Doing so will ensure peak performance for your mower and can reduce emissions up to 50 percent.

3. Fill a gas can with fresh gas from the pump, and add fuel treatment and stabilizer to the gas can. Keep in mind gas begins to degrade and oxidize after 30 days. Oxidized gas can cause carburetor jets to plug, resulting in an engine that doesn't start, and can cost a significant amount to fix.

4. After tuning up your mower, dispose of used oil at your local hazardous waste center. Pick-up by your municipality may also be available in your area.

Source: Briggs & Stratton

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Energy-Efficient Upgrades that Pay Back

April 29, 2015 2:09 am

(Family Features) Homeowners today are seeking upgrades that not only look great, but save money. Energy-efficiency improvements are a smart investment toward curbing energy use, cutting energy bills, and increasing the value of a home.

To take the guesswork out of choosing the most cost-effective upgrades, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC) ranked the top energy-efficient improvements. Here are some of the projects that will give a homeowner the most bang for their buck.

1. Sealing windows and doors consistently has the best payback for homeowners in all regions of the U.S. Proper air-sealing can reduce air infiltration by 30 percent, and has a payback within one to four years. Sealing leaks can also reduce noise pollution and prevent pollen or dust from entering the home.

2. Replacing windows and lighting with more energy-efficient options can significantly reduce energy bills and emissions. Swapping incandescent bulbs with high-efficacy fluorescent bulbs can substantially reduce annual carbon dioxide emissions, and the switch could pay for itself in less than a year.

3. Space heating and cooling accounts for the greatest energy use in the house. In many parts of the country, replacing a furnace or boiler with a high-efficiency model can pay for itself within the first year. Additionally, a dual-fuel system, like using a high-efficiency air-source heat pump in tandem with a high-efficiency propane furnace, offers big energy and emissions savings -- up to as much as three metric tons each year.

4. Water heating is typically the second largest energy consumer in the house. Upgrading a system, especially switching from an electric model to a propane-fueled, condensing tank-less system, can save up to 50 percent and significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In addition, new U.S. Department of Energy regulations now in effect mean that older water heaters between eight and 12 years of age need to be updated to meet new efficiency standards.

Source: PERC

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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