RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

The Great Debate: Saltwater vs. Chlorine Pools

June 10, 2015 1:45 am

(Family Features) For many families, some of the most anticipated summertime activities happen around the pool. Both chlorine and saltwater pools are common in homes today, but there are distinct differences between the two. In a saltwater pool, chlorine is produced by a salt chlorine generator, rather than adding chlorine to the pool directly. A saltwater pool is still being sanitized by chlorine.

Before you dive into the fun, remember that saltwater pools require the same maintenance functions and still must be checked and balanced regularly, just like a traditional chlorine pool. Here’s how to do it.

Test the Water Daily

Whether your pool uses traditional chlorine or is equipped with a salt chlorine generator, make testing it a top priority, especially when your pool is used frequently.

Make sure to read and follow the product label instructions closely when dealing with pool chemicals. Proper dosing of pool chemicals is important for swimmer comfort.

Always test the water and make sure the free chlorine level never falls below 1 parts per million (ppm). Chlorine is the main sanitizer of your pool (and drinking water), and the more people in your pool, the more chlorine you may need.

Keep Water Balanced


If your eyes are irritated and the pool water is cloudy or looks green, the balance is probably off. Here's how to test it:

- Use strips that show chlorine, alkalinity, pH and cyanuric acid levels.
- Follow instructions on the package for how to submerge the strip.
- Compare color readings on the strip to the range on the product bottle.

Ideal water balance ranges for chlorine are 1-4 ppm; alkalinity, 80-120 ppm; pH, 7.2-7.6; cyanuric acid, 20-50 ppm.

Source:
SaltorChlorine.org

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Don't Sweat It: A/C Maintenance Tips

June 10, 2015 1:45 am

As the temperature rises outside, it is becoming more challenging for homeowners to keep energy costs low while keeping cool inside. According to the HVAC Inspection, Maintenance and Restoration Association (also known as NADCA), there is a way to decrease energy usage and still beat the heat.

“Air conveyance systems are the largest sources of energy within a home, so it’s important to clean the units whenever needed, in order to avoid increased costs and energy usage,” says NADCA President Bill Benito. “When the units are not in use, they collect a lot of dirt and dust; when they are turned on during the summer months, all of that dust and dirt gets blown back into the home.”

NADCA recommends hiring a certified contractor to inspect air-handling units and test for efficiency. Proper duct cleaning and sealing of the air handling unit will help maximize system efficiency and performance during the hottest months of the year, when the air conditioners run the most often.

“Dirty or contaminated filters and poorly maintained air handling systems can reduce air flow and efficiency. Dirty coils can cause a unit to work harder to pump out cool air, which will ultimately lead to increased energy costs,” adds Benito.

A complete and proper cleaning, according to industry standards, will remove built up particulate and contaminants, resulting in improved indoor air quality. The standard defines complete cleaning to include the inside of air ducts from where air enters the return duct, through the air handler (blower, coil and heat exchange), to the exit, where the air is released to condition the home.

Source: NADCA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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