RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

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Identifying Coverage Gaps for Home-Based Businesses

May 18, 2015 12:48 am

For many, achieving the American dream comes with the freedom of operating a home-based business. But without proper insurance planning, even the most promising dream can quickly turn into a nightmare. Blurring the lines between home and work can have unexpected and costly impacts on all types of personal insurance, says the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC).

To avoid costly impacts, the NAIC recommends home-based business owners consider these personal insurance implications:

Home – Homeowners’ or renters’ insurance policies are rarely adequate for business needs. Owners may want to investigate a business owners' policy or general liability, business property and business interruption/continuation insurance.

Auto – If you own or lease a vehicle almost exclusively for business use, list the business name as the principal insured. Consider also increasing coverage to protect permanently attached items, such as a generator or storage unit.

Health – There are a variety of sources for purchasing HMOs, PPOs, EPOs and other popular health insurance plans at group rates. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), business owners and the self-employed who purchase coverage through new health insurance marketplaces may qualify for tax credits.

Life – If the home business is a partnership, consider key person life insurance which names each partner in a business as beneficiary on the other partner's policy. If one partner passes away, the other can use funds to buy out heirs, pay off loans or continue operations.

Source: NAIC

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Outdoor Kitchens: Layout First, Design Second

May 18, 2015 12:48 am

(Family Features) One of the most popular features in backyard spaces is a fully-equipped kitchen suited for entertaining and outdoor living. But like its interior counterpart, designing an outdoor kitchen can be a challenge.

Your first consideration should be location. Pay attention to the prevailing winds, says Ken Kelly, Kitchen Designs by Ken Kelly. "Wind direction and where the kitchen is located could cause smoke to blow into guests or even into the house through an open window," he says. "Keep the grill downwind of guests."

Your second consideration should be grill placement. “Do you want the cook to face the guests, or look at the scenery?” asks Russ Faulk, Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet. “When the cook can talk to the guests, the space becomes more social and enjoyable,” he says.

Once you’ve established a wind-friendly location and optimal grill placement, cordon off wet, cold, hot and dry zones, says Faulk. These zones will make prepping food, cooking and cleaning much easier.

"Keep the cold zone next to the wet zone. This makes it easier to move things from the cold zone refrigerator to the wet zone sink to wash them off and get them ready for the grill in the hot zone," he adds.

Zones are especially important if a pool is nearby. "Keep the cold zone nearest to the pool," says Faulk. "It will keep kids who want a cold drink from running past a hot grill."

Don’t forget counter space. Grills should have a minimum of 24 inches of uninterrupted space to one side and 12 inches to the other. This gives the cook room to place platters, cooking utensils and other essentials.

If an outdoor space lacks room for that amount of counter space, "incorporate an open-shelf cabinet below. You get additional 'counter space' by being able to put things on shelves," says Kelly.

With the right planning, homeowners and their guests can enjoy an outdoor kitchen for many years to come.

Source: Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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