RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

8 Tips for Choosing a Locksmith

July 9, 2015 2:48 am

When it comes to service industries, the best deals aren’t always best for consumers – and security services are certainly worth the cost. One security service homeowners may call upon is the help of a locksmith, but it’s important to seek out a reputable and reliable professional. According to America’s Lock experts, here’s how.

1. Consider dealing with a local company
that has roots in the community they serve. A local locksmith service is preferable to national chains who may farm out work. This is also an excellent way to reduce the wait time and travel expenses.

2. Check references; ask friends, neighbors, and co-workers who they used and check on-line reviews.

3. Make sure that the locksmith can perform the job.
Some locksmiths may be great for an automotive lock-out emergency, but they may not do residential work. Check the company's website or Yellow Pages.

4. Ask for an address
(this may not apply to a mobile locksmith service) and check to see that it is a legitimate address. It is really important to check the signage of a mobile locksmith vehicle. A reputable company will have good signage on service vehicle.

5. Make sure that the company is licensed and check to see what professional organizations the locksmith company belongs to. Always ask for proper identification and check it with the locksmith office. Make sure that the company runs background and criminal checks on their employees.

6. Always use a company that is fully insured and bonded.
This will protect your property should something go wrong.

7. Always ask for proper identification and check it with the locksmith office.

8. Get a written estimate. A telephone estimate should be available in an emergency, but make sure that the telephone estimate and the one you receive in writing are the same. Ask for all charges, including travel charges, minimum fees and after-hours work. Never sign a blank work authorization form.

Source: America’s Lock

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Homeless Fare Better with Housing Vouchers

July 9, 2015 2:48 am

Homeless families offered housing vouchers experience significantly better outcomes than families assigned other options, according to findings from a recent report by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The report reveals families offered a Housing Choice Voucher are less likely to experience housing instability than others offered community-based rapid re-housing, project-based transitional housing, or “usual care,” such as an extended stay in an emergency shelter.

“The results of this study demonstrate the wide-ranging benefits of supporting families experiencing homelessness with stable and enduring rental assistance—such as the assistance provided through our Housing Choice Voucher Program,” says HUD Assistant Secretary of Policy Development and Research Kathy O’Regan. “We will continue to study the efficacy of these interventions to see if the longer term outcomes mirror those we see in the short term.”

According to the report, emergency shelter programs have the highest average per-family monthly costs of approximately $4,800, compared to transitional housing at $2,700, a voucher at $1,160 per month, and rapid re-housing at $880 per month.

An estimated 150,000 U.S. families experience homelessness each year. Intervention options offered include a permanent housing subsidy (generally the Housing Choice Voucher), which assists with locating housing but does not offer additional supportive services; community-based rapid re-housing, which provides temporary rental assistance and limited services; project-based transitional housing, which provides temporary housing in agency-controlled units and intensive services; and “usual care,” which is defined as any housing or services a family accesses in the absence of immediate referral to other interventions.

Source: HUD.gov

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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