RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Don't Delay Buying a Home – It Can Cost You

July 14, 2015 3:00 am

If you are on the fence about buying a home, consider this: waiting to buy could cost thousands in accumulated wealth. According to a recent realtor.com® report, the financial penalties of delaying or forgoing on a home purchase have become very steep – the average buyer is estimated to gain $217,726 (in today’s dollars) in wealth over a 30-year period.

Although some markets are more buyer-friendly than others, national data shows homeowners see significant financial benefits as compared to lifetime renters. In nearly 90 percent of metro areas, buying a home produces a financial benefit of at least $100,000 over 30 years.

“This analysis looks solely at the financial reasons to buy a home, based on assumptions about rising mortgage rates and changes in home values," realtor.com® Chief Economist Jonathan Smoke says. "It's important to remember that a home purchase decision is deeply personal. Potential buyers need to consider factors such as upcoming life events, job security and potential relocation, in addition to financial benefits, because they too can have a significant impact on ownership."

Source: realtor.com®

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Properly Dispose of Household Hazardous Waste

July 13, 2015 12:51 am

Following a severe storm, homeowners and renters should take special care when collecting and disposing of household hazardous wastes. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), homeowners and renters affected by disaster should, whenever feasible, separate hazardous household waste from other debris before disposal.

Among the items that fall into the household hazardous waste category are paints and solvents, cleaning materials, batteries, oils and petroleum products, pesticides, explosives, swimming pool chemicals and pressurized gas cylinders.

Improper disposal of household hazardous waste includes pouring it down the drain, on the ground, into storm drains/sewers, or in some cases putting it out with the trash. The dangers of such disposal methods might not be immediately obvious. Certain types of household hazardous waste have the potential to cause physical injury to sanitation workers, contaminate septic tanks or wastewater treatment systems, and pose health hazards to both humans and animals.

Oil-contaminated debris or material tainted by other petroleum products should be segregated and stored in a well-ventilated area. If stored outdoors, household hazardous materials should be covered to keep precipitation from contaminating nearby soil and water.

After separating out household hazardous waste, take the waste (or arrange for it to be taken) to a facility that accepts toxic materials. To find a facility that accepts household hazardous waste in your area, contact your local Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) office.

Source: FEMA.gov

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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