RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

5 Tips for a Tidier Home

June 3, 2015 1:18 am

(Family Features) No one wants to spend their weekend doing chores, especially when pleasant weather arrives. Get a handle on household dirt with these efficient, effective cleaning tips from the experts at home product provider Eureka.

1. Repel sweaty hands and scratches. Use furniture polish with a citrus base when cleaning appliances. These products create a low-friction surface that reduce scratches and leave an oily layer which keeps sweaty palms and fingerprints at bay.

2. Organize the entryway. Make outdoor fun more accessible with a tidy entryway, mud room or coat closet. Create bins to organize all accessories for outdoor activities: balls and gloves in one bin, swimming toys and goggles in another, and so on.

3. Recruit a cleaning crew. Give the kids something to do in summer with a few daily chores. This will lighten your load and teach lessons of accountability and responsibility. Even little mess-makers can help with age-appropriate jobs, such as picking up toys or sorting laundry by color. Create a chore chart to help keep everyone on task and ensure chores are completed in a timely fashion.

4. Create a clutter-free zone. Give yourself a little breathing room and assign a special area where no personal belongings can be placed. The kitchen is a great spot to keep clutter-free so meal prep is easier and there's a comfortable place for the family to gather.

5. Dust daily. Set aside just 10 to 15 minutes a day to properly dust one room in the home. A microfiber cloth attached to the end of a long pole with a rubber band is an easy way to reach tough spots such as light fixtures, ceilings and corners, as well as baseboards and behind heavy furniture.

Source: Walmart.com/Eureka

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Electrical Alphabet Soup: AFCIs, TRRs and More

June 3, 2015 1:18 am

There are a myriad of components involved in a home’s electrical system, and any one of them can malfunction, increasing the possibility of fire and shock, according to Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI). To minimize risk, consider protecting your home with arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs), ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) and tamper resistant receptacles (TRRs).

AFCIs – One of the major causes of electrical fire is an arc fault, which is caused by damaged, overheated or stressed wiring or devices. The most common AFCI is a branch/feeder, which replaces standard circuit breakers in the home’s electrical service panel and detects hazardous arcing conditions, shutting down electricity before a fire can start.

Other options include outlet AFCIs, which provide protection to power cords plugged into the receptacle, and combination AFCIs, which provide parallel protection for branch circuit wiring, cord sets and power supply cords downstream of the device.

GFCIs – A GFCI is a device designed to protect people from electric shock by constantly monitoring electricity flow in a circuit and quickly switching off power if it senses any loss of current. Typically, they are installed in areas where water and electricity are in close proximity, such as the bathroom, garage, kitchen and basement.

GFCIs can be installed at the main service panel, in place of standard electrical outlets, or can be used as a portable device. While GFCIs should be installed by a licensed electrician, portable GFCIs require no tools to install.

TRRs
– TRRs look just like ordinary outlets, but are designed with spring-loaded receptacle cover plates that close off the openings or slots. When equal pressure is simultaneously applied to both sides, the receptacle cover plates open to allow the standard plug to make contact with the receptacle contact points.

Without simultaneous pressure, the cover plates remain closed, preventing insertion of foreign objects and protecting children from electrical injuries. TRR technology can be combined with AFCI and GFCI receptacles.

All of these devices have proven so effective that the National Electrical Code® (NEC) requires them to be installed in all new homes. Existing homes with aging electrical systems can also benefit from these advanced technologies, which should be installed by a qualified electrician.

Source: ESFI

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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