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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

The Psychology of Holiday Gift-Giving

December 7, 2017 1:42 am

There's no arguing that deciding what gift to give someone can be a bit of a brain workout, especially if that loved one is someone you see infrequently. A recent study from Carnegie Mellon University fused economics and psychology to determine how we locate the "perfect gift." Here are four science-backed tips to help during the holiday shopping season.

Avoid Guessing. Projection bias is a phenomenon that describes how people believe others hold the same beliefs and values as they do—and will in the future. When gift giving, shoppers often try to predict what the recipient would like, thinking recipients will share their same tastes.

"If you like dark chocolate and loath milk chocolate, it's very tempting to give dark chocolate, even if the gift recipient's tastes are opposite to yours; it's very difficult to imagine that another person would enjoy receiving a gift that you would hate," says George Loewenstein, the Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Economics and Psychology in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences and co-founder of the field of behavioral economics.

Be Aware of Your Shopping Environment. Kareem Haggag, assistant professor of economics in the Social and Decision Sciences Department, studies attribution bias, and his work shows that the past experiences of gift-givers will influence their opinion of a product.

He advised gift givers to be careful and think about past experiences with an item they are considering purchasing.

Consider Whether Past Holidays Are an Influence. If you were not thanked by a recipient in the past, you may be less likely to put time and effort into gift-giving for that person in the future, according to Shereen J. Chaudhry (DC'13, '16).

Chaudhry says that words of thanks are more than "cheap talk" and help keep relationships healthy.

Focus on the Long-Term. Researchers led by the Tepper School of Business' Jeff Galak found that gift givers tend to focus on the moment of exchange when selecting a gift, whereas gift recipients are more focused on the long-term utility or practical attributes of the gift.

Source: Carnegie Mellon University

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Dos and Don'ts for Job Interview Follow-Ups

December 7, 2017 1:42 am

If you're hunting for a new job, you likely know that sending a "thank you" note post-interview can be a huge deciding factor as to whether or not you land the gig.

Research from Accountemps provides the following dos and don'ts for giving thanks:

Do add value. Instead of writing a generic note, customize the message by mentioning a skill that wasn't brought up during the interview or expounding on a topic that was discussed.

Don't delay. Send a thank-you note within 24 hours. Some employers make hiring decisions shortly after the round of interviews is complete, and you don't want to risk sending your note after that window has closed.

Do proofread. Sending a thank-you message can backfire if you go about it the wrong way. Typos and grammatical mistakes may come across as a lack of attention to detail. Take the time to review, revise and refine your thank-you note.

Don't be pushy. If you don't hear from the employer within a week of the interview, it's appropriate to follow-up with a phone call or another email. But do so in moderation. Persistence is laudable, but pestering can get you removed from the short list.

Source: Accountemps

Published with permission from RISMedia.