RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

How to Save on Unpredictable Energy Costs

June 30, 2015 2:18 am

Sizzling heat and freezing temperatures can take a sizable chunk out of household budgets throughout the year. “Changing seasons require renters and homeowners to adapt quickly when it comes to household savings,” says National Foundation for Credit Counseling© (NFCC©) spokesperson Bruce McClary. “The good news is that there is more than one way to achieve the kind of energy efficiency that can add up to extra savings.”

According to the NFCC, homeowners and renters can spend less on energy by:

• Turning off lights, televisions, stereos, computers, and other electrical devises when not in use;

• Installing a programmable thermostat to efficiently manage heating and cooling;

• Plugging items such as televisions and DVR players into a power strip to prevent them from running on standby;

• Drying dishes by hand instead of using a heated drying cycle in the dishwasher;

• Lowering the hot water heater thermostat to 120 degrees Fahrenheit;

• Replacing older shower heads with low flow attachments;

• Waiting for a full load before washing clothes and dishes;

• Using a clothesline to dry clothes or using the air dry setting on the dryer;

• Closing all windows and doors when heating or cooling the home.

Remember light bulbs, home appliances, electronics and other products that display the ENERGY STAR® label are products that comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy guidelines.

If energy costs have contributed to uncontrollable debt, the NFCC can provide financial counseling in-person, by phone, or online. To reach a certified financial counselor, visit www.nfcc.org.

Source: NFCC

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The Far-Reaching Impact of Household Food Waste

June 29, 2015 2:15 am

There’s no arguing food waste is a common occurrence in homes across America. According to a recent survey by TNS Global, more than half of households in the U.S. throw out leftovers at least once a week, and a nearly equal amount throw away food they bought, but never consumed. Government figures estimate households waste $900 in unconsumed food each year.

When asked what concerns them most when wasting food, almost 80 percent of respondents cited money lost; about half were bothered by the fact that others do not have enough to eat. Less than 20 percent pointed to adverse impacts on the environment, although the EPA says wasted food is the most prevalent material in landfills and contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. The EPA also expresses concern over the wasted energy, water and other resources used to produce the 30-40 percent of food that goes uneaten in the U.S.

One way to reduce food waste is through proper packaging. Plastic packaging helps prevent food waste by providing barriers to oxygen, light, temperatures, moisture, microbes and other factors that lead to spoilage.

“Just a little bit of plastic packaging can prevent a whole lot of food waste,” says Steve Russell of the American Chemistry Council.

Though less than half of survey respondents say they actively use proper packaging at home, nearly all said they take or one or more steps to prevent food waste, such as eating leftovers and avoiding over-buying of perishables.

Source: Plastics Make It Possible

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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