RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Aging in Place Remodels Most Popular

July 10, 2015 12:51 am

As the housing market continues its recovery, homeowners are increasingly seeking more square footage and accessibility in and out of the home, suggesting an aging in place trend, reports a recent American Institute of Architects (AIA) Home Design Trends Survey. Popular design requests by homeowners also include single-floor plans and informal, open-space layouts.

“An increase in home square footage with the rising popularity of accessible design concepts points to a population that is preparing to age-in-place, or, perhaps, is anticipating responsibility for caretaking of older relatives in the future,” says AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker, PhD, Hon. AIA. “As homeowners prepare to stay in their current homes, investment in outdoor living spaces has also increased.”

In outdoor spaces, homeowners most covet low-irrigation landscaping, exterior security lighting and blended indoor-outdoor living, according to the survey.

The remodeling industry as a whole has seen a slight uptick in the last year, particularly when it comes to remodeling custom or luxury homes, move-up homes, second homes or vacation homes. First-time homes and affordable homes saw little increase in remodeling. Kitchen and bathroom projects, as well as projects in townhouses and condos, remained relatively unchanged.

Source: AIA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Is That Garden Guest a Friend or Foe?

July 9, 2015 2:48 am

It pays to know what’s what in your backyard. According to Gardener’s Supply experts, crawling, buzzing, flying and diving insects can either be pests or pollinators, and it’s important to know the difference.

Often mistaken for a paper wasp, hornet or bumblebee, the honeybee is responsible for pollinating flowers and food alike and should be a welcome guest in your garden. Honeybees generally don’t sting unless threatened.

Yellow jackets, however, are much more likely to sting without provocation, but they also do good for your garden – yellow jackets feed on pest insects including houseflies, caterpillars and grasshoppers.

If a yellow jacket appears threatening, hang a lantern-style object that looks like a wasp's nest to trick it into splitting the scene.

Source: Gardener’s Supply Company

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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