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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

3 Ways to Customize Your Bathroom

September 17, 2015 1:06 am

9/17

3 Ways to Customize Your Bathroom

(BPT) - Creating a custom bathroom doesn't have to involve an extensive (and expensive!) renovation. To get the custom look for less, start with the shower, which is among the least costly components to upgrade.

Simply replacing a utilitarian showerhead, for example, with one that features multiple settings can be a major improvement. Multi-spray, single-spray, rainfall, shower arms and hand showers can work together in virtually any combination you choose. Showerheads can be mounted on the wall or ceiling, depending on the model you choose. Various models are water-efficient, too. Most showerhead changes can operate off existing plumbing, but homeowners should feel free to consult a plumbing professional if desired.

Light can also make a splash in the shower – pun intended! Shower lighting now goes way beyond a single recessed canister light set in the ceiling. Dimmable lighting allows you to control the amount of light stimulation, from low and relaxing to bright and invigorating. Ceiling-mounted chromatherapy lights use the color spectrum to further enhance mood in your shower. Cables of LED lights at the top or bottom of a shower enclosure can accent the space and provide low-level light. Sconces and overhead lighting can help fully illuminate the shower when needed.

Shower seats are another inexpensive option, from stylish portable versions to wall-mounted models that folds flat to the wall when not in use. Short on space in the shower? Opt for a corner seat, like a removable corner stool, or consider adding a simple foot rest.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The Pitfalls of Joint Banking

September 17, 2015 1:06 am

Joint bank accounts are often viewed as an easy way to give financial caregivers the ability to manage money on behalf of older adults. In some cases, they are used so the co-signee inherits the funds upon the death of the primary account holder. However, both parties rarely understand the risks associated with joint accounts - or the alternatives available to them, according to the American Bankers Association (ABA) Foundation and the AARP.

“At any age, joint accounts may work for some, but we urge you to use caution before signing on the dotted line,” says AARP Chief Public Policy Officer Debra Whitman. “If you don't look before you leap, you could fall into trouble with your finances.”

Before deciding if a joint account is right for you, consider the following factors:

• The co-signee becomes financially responsible for taxes on the account. That means should the primary account holder owe the government back taxes at any point, the co-signee would be just as responsible to the IRS for that money.

• The money is just as much theirs as it is yours. Once someone is listed as a joint account holder, the co-signee and the primary account holder own that money equally in the eyes of a financial institution. Both parties will have the ability to withdraw funds whenever they see fit.

• Creditors can come after those funds. If an account owner were to incur substantial medical bills or face a lawsuit, the funds in the joint account could be used as a liable asset. A creditor might not differentiate between primary account holder and co-signee.

“Setting up a joint account essentially removes the financial firewall between both parties,” says ABA Senior Vice President of Bank Community Engagement Corey Carlisle. “There are often alternatives available that will protect the assets of older customers, as well as those of financial caregivers.”

Source: ABA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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