RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Elevating Your Garden: 3 Questions to Ask

August 12, 2015 2:09 am

(BPT) – According to the Garden Writer’s Association, an astounding 78 million households in America grow gardens, including those with raised beds and planter boxes. If you've never considered using either, think again: these tools offer high yields and a longer overall gardening season, say Western Red Cedar Lumber Association (RealCedar.com) experts.

Before you begin elevating your garden with either raised beds or planter boxes, ask yourself the following:

Where will I place my garden beds?

This may be determined by the specific space you have available. If you have a few options, look for the sunniest spot possible. Remember that larger beds will have greater yields, but they also require more work. It's best to build your beds to match the gardening time you have available.

What's the right size bed for my space?

As you're planning your bed size, remember you'll need to work in the space as well. The garden bed's width can range from 2 to 4 feet and the ideal length is 8 to 12 feet. No matter the dimensions you choose, make sure your beds and planters are at least 6 inches deep; 12 inches is optimal for allowing the roots to grow deep and strong.

Is my soil ready?

Before you start digging, make sure your soil is ready for success. Dig down 6 to 8 inches and loosen the soil. Create a mixture of top soil and organic material, such as compost or manure. Once the soil is ready, it's time to start watering, weeding and fertilizing. You may discover your garden quickly dries out in the sun – if this is the case, a layer of mulch will help your soil retain moisture.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Generator Safety: 6 Tips to Stay Vigilant

August 12, 2015 2:09 am

(Family Features) When weather or other unforeseen circumstances cause a power outage, many households rely on portable generators to serve as temporary power sources. Though there are benefits to using a portable generator, homeowners run the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning if it is not handled properly, according to the Portable Generator Manufacturers’ Association (PGMA).

The PGMA recommends homeowners become familiar with portable generator safety before operating. Keep the operator’s manual in a safe place so you can refer to it easily. Remember:

1. Never run a portable generator indoors or in partially-enclosed spaces, even if you plan to use fans or open doors or windows for ventilation.

2. Always take your portable generator outside, placing it downwind with the engine exhaust pointed away from occupied spaces.

3. Avoid placing a portable generator near windows, doors or vents, as carbon monoxide gas can accumulate and potentially be drawn indoors.

4. Install battery-operated carbon monoxide alarms according to manufacturer's instructions. Replace batteries and test the alarm regularly to ensure it is in good working condition.

5. Know how to recognize the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning: headache, nausea, dizziness, shortness of breath, weakness and fainting.

6. If you feel sick, dizzy or weak while using your portable generator, get to fresh air immediately and call 911 for emergency medical attention.

Source: PGMAOnline.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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