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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Traveling by Air? 4 Tips for Your Pet

August 12, 2015 2:09 am

Did you know that over two million pets and other live animals are transported by air every year in the United States? Whether you’re planning to fly cross-country or abroad, it’s important to make traveling arrangements for your furry friend before getting on the plane. USA.gov recommends:

Travelers ask their airline about requirements for and restrictions on traveling with a pet. Check with your airline to find out if they allow pets in the passenger cabin. If you can't bring your pet on your flight as checked or carry-on baggage, you might be able to ship your pet as cargo. You’ll likely have to provide a certificate from a veterinarian stating that your pet is in good health. Airlines may not, however, require health certificates for service animals used by people with disabilities.

Travelers make sure they bring an approved kennel.
The kennel for a carry-on pet must fit under the seat in front of you, and your airline will likely require your pet to stay in the kennel during the flight and in the airport. You'll want to de-clutter your pet's kennel before you get to the airport, in case TSA agents need to do a physical inspection of your pet's carrier.

Travelers carry a leash. Whether you need to walk Fido through a metal detector or carry him through, bringing a leash can help keep your animal under control in the busy airport environment.

Travelers take comfort into account.
Traveling, particularly loading and unloading, can be stressful for an animal, so you should always consider your pet's comfort. Try feeding your pet a light meal two hours before getting to the airport. Walk your pet before leaving for the airport, and again before checking in. While you should leave the sedatives at home, if you're thinking about giving your pet something to help it sleep easier on the trip, always check with your veterinarian first.

Source: USA.gov

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Elevating Your Garden: 3 Questions to Ask

August 12, 2015 2:09 am

(BPT) – According to the Garden Writer’s Association, an astounding 78 million households in America grow gardens, including those with raised beds and planter boxes. If you've never considered using either, think again: these tools offer high yields and a longer overall gardening season, say Western Red Cedar Lumber Association (RealCedar.com) experts.

Before you begin elevating your garden with either raised beds or planter boxes, ask yourself the following:

Where will I place my garden beds?

This may be determined by the specific space you have available. If you have a few options, look for the sunniest spot possible. Remember that larger beds will have greater yields, but they also require more work. It's best to build your beds to match the gardening time you have available.

What's the right size bed for my space?

As you're planning your bed size, remember you'll need to work in the space as well. The garden bed's width can range from 2 to 4 feet and the ideal length is 8 to 12 feet. No matter the dimensions you choose, make sure your beds and planters are at least 6 inches deep; 12 inches is optimal for allowing the roots to grow deep and strong.

Is my soil ready?

Before you start digging, make sure your soil is ready for success. Dig down 6 to 8 inches and loosen the soil. Create a mixture of top soil and organic material, such as compost or manure. Once the soil is ready, it's time to start watering, weeding and fertilizing. You may discover your garden quickly dries out in the sun – if this is the case, a layer of mulch will help your soil retain moisture.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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