RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Insulation Tips to Keep Heat in, Cold out this Winter

October 12, 2015 12:12 am

(BPT) – One of the easiest ways to ward off winter’s chill at home is to increase insulation. And the best time to do it is autumn, before bitter cold sets in. To begin, assess the insulation in your basement, says Tom Savoy, technical director for Insulfoam.

“Up to 25 percent of a home’s heat loss is through the basement,” says Savoy. "Even if you don't spend time in the basement, it's crucial to insulate it right to help manage the heating throughout the rest of your home," says Savoy.

Many homes in the U.S. were built with fiberglass batts between wood wall studs, which are notoriously leaky, providing a bridge for heat to pass through the wall. Such insulation can also trap moisture in the walls, causing that musty basement smell.

A simple solution is adding a layer of continuous insulation to the home's basement walls using rigid foam boards, such as expanded polystyrene (EPS). Available in home improvement stores, EPS insulation is easy to cut and install using standard tools around the house. Unlike many other types of insulation, rigid foam boards are thin and easy to handle, without messy fibers to clean-up.

To get started, you will first need to figure out how much insulation you will need based on its "R-value." R-value is the measure of insulation's ability to resist heat flow, with higher numbers meaning better performance. A quick call to your city or county building department will let you know what R-value is appropriate, and if you'll need to take anything else into account with your insulation project.

In addition to insulating the basement, another leaky area to check is attic hatches. As heat rises, these hatches often have gaps around them, allowing the warm air to escape. Properly sealing them with weather stripping and adding a layer of rigid foam to the hatch will help keep heat in your living area.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Post-Storm Electrical Hazards to Watch For

October 12, 2015 12:12 am

In the days following a severe storm, flooding can result in electrical hazards in the home and on the surrounding property. In fact, electrical equipment exposed to water can be extremely dangerous if reenergized without property reconditioning or replacement, according to the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI). Damage to electrical equipment can also result from exposure to flood waters contaminated with chemicals, sewage, oil and other debris.

“As families begin cleaning up after a flood, there are many hidden electrical hazards throughout the home,” says ESFI President Brett Brenner.  “Water and electricity don’t mix, and the dangers associated with submerged electrical equipment can be deadly.”

The ESFI strongly advises homeowners not to use electrical appliances that have been wet until they have been examined by a qualified service repair dealer. Certain equipment will require replacement, while a trained professional may be able to recondition other devices.

Electrical items, such as circuit breakers, fuses, ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs), receptacles, plugs and switches, can malfunction when water and silt get inside. Discard them if they have been submerged.

Keep in mind ocean water and salt spray can be particularly damaging to electrical equipment due to the corrosive and conductive nature of the salt water residue.

When it comes to downed power lines, always assume they are energized. Contact your utility company immediately to report downed lines, and stay at least 10 feet away from the line and anything it may be touching, such as a fence, tree limb or water. Never touch a person or object that is in direct or indirect contact with a downed power line. Instead, call 911 immediately.

Additionally, never attempt to move a downed power line – leave it to the professionals. Do not try to move a downed power line with another object. Even non-conductive materials like wood or cloth that are slightly wet can conduct electricity.

Portable generators can also be dangerous if not used properly. Do not operate a portable generator in your home or in any other enclosed or even-partially enclosed area. Generators can very quickly produce high levels of carbon monoxide, which can be deadly. Make sure that there is at least one battery-operated or battery backup carbon monoxide alarm in your home. Test it before using your generator.

Do not connect generators directly to the household wiring unless an appropriate transfer switch has been installed by a licensed, qualified electrician.  Always turn the generator off and let it cool down before refueling.

Source: ESFI

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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