RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Binge-Watchers: When Were You Hooked?

September 25, 2015 1:24 am

It may have taken “Breaking Bad” character Walter White nearly an entire season to become Heisenberg, but as Netflix reports, fans committed to the series long before the plot twist unfolded – and it wasn’t during the pilot episode.

“Given the precious nature of primetime slots on traditional TV, a series pilot is arguably the most important point in the life of the show,” says Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos. “However, in our research of more than 20 shows across 16 markets, we found that no one was ever hooked on the pilot.”

According to Netflix’s research, fandom emerges when commercial breaks and appointment viewing are stripped away. In fact, 70 percent of viewers who watched the “hooked” episode across Netflix and non-Netflix programming went on to complete season one in uninterrupted format.

Netflix also evaluated global fandom trends, revealing some interesting finds. The Dutch, for instance, tend to fall in love with a series the fastest, getting hooked one episode ahead of most countries irrespective of the program. Down Under, viewers hold out longer across the board, getting hooked two episodes later than the rest of the world. Inexplicably, Germans exhibited early fandom for “Arrow,” whereas France fell first for “How I Met Your Mother.”

Source: Netflix

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Ways to Prevent Scams against Seniors

September 24, 2015 1:18 am

According to Consumer Reports, seniors and their loved ones lose billions of dollars to fraudsters every year, typically through phone scams that take advantage of a senior’s isolation. Staying involved in the community, advises the nonprofit organization, is key to preventing elder financial abuse.

Consumer Reports also suggests the following tips:

Stop robocalls.
Sign up for Nomorobo, a free service available to customers with VoIP service with select providers. Consider a white list call blocker device, which blocks numbers that are not programmed into it. And, if someone from an unknown number calls, don’t press to connect to a representative – just hang up. Responding to a call demonstrates a live person is there, which can generate more calls. Also, sign up for the National Do Not Call Registry (donotcall.gov or 888-382-1222); it won’t prevent crooks from calling, but it will limit legitimate marketing calls.

Have someone help pay the bills. Create a shared bank account with a trusted friend or family member. Arrange to transfer only enough money each month to pay the bills. Get to know the officers and tellers at the local bank or credit union; they may raise a flag if they notice suspicious activity on an account.

Arrange for limited account oversight. Some financial institutions will send statements and alerts to a trusted person who has no direct access to a senior’s account but can check for suspected fraud. EverSafe is a paid, Web-based service that consolidates all accounts in one place and checks for suspicious activity daily. Someone else can receive the online statements without having access to the accounts that are being monitored.

Vet all contractors and financial advisors’ credentials. For contractors, check with the state licensing board and the local Better Business Bureau. Ask for proof of insurance and bonding. Don’t pay in full up front. For financial advisors, check brokercheck.finra.org to find regulatory actions, violations, or complaints.

Set up an emergency plan.
Temporary hospitalization or permanent incapacity are just two reasons someone may not be able to control his or her own finances. Give power of attorney to someone trusted and financially secure. The power-of-attorney document can be drawn up with limits, such as assigning a relative or friend to monitor the person with power of attorney; mandating a periodic written report of financial transactions; or assigning joint powers of attorney, which requires two signatures on every check.

Source: Consumer Reports

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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