RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Frustrated by a Furniture Retailer? You're Not Alone

March 24, 2016 1:48 am

Consumers rely on a range of industries and services when it comes to owning a home—but one service tends to leave little to be desired, according to a report by the Better Business Bureau (BBB).

The BBB, which facilitates consumer grievances with various industries, reports that more consumers are submitting complaints about furniture retailers, citing a 12.9 percent spike in complaints in the last year alone.

“The furniture industry saw 5 percent growth in 2015, so that explains part of the increase,” says Rubens Pessanha, director of Market Research and Insights for the Council of Better Business Bureaus. “More than half of the complaints to BBB had to do with the products themselves: the quality, delivery, guarantees, and refunds and exchanges.

“The good news,” Pessanha adds, “is that the industry has a respectable rate of settling BBB complaints…85 percent. That’s better than the overall average of 79 percent across all industries.”

The BBB also reported an increase in inquiries related to home maintenance services, though these inquiries do not necessarily reflect complaints on the part of consumers.

Source: BBB

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Crafting Shelter for Birds, Spaces for Spring Singers – Pt. 1

March 24, 2016 1:48 am

The quintessential sign that spring has sprung is the boisterous singing of backyard birds. Sure, there's always a crow's caw or sparrow's chirp around the backyard in winter, but we're talking about singers!

According to Audubon New York, protecting birds is a critical environmental mission—and who wouldn't like attracting a few more springtime song birds to their yards?

Whether your yard is large or small, you can use it to help birds, according to the organization's website, by providing food, water, shelter and potential nesting places, you can help birds thrive and survive.

And with a few simple steps, you can create a haven for both migratory and resident birds. For attracting birds, Audubon New York advises:

• Take inventory of what you already have and consider ways you can supplement what’s already there with native plants that help mimic natural habitats;

• Incorporate plants that offer shelter, food, nesting material and even a singing perch;

• Add a bird bath and additional foods, such as sunflower and suet, to help round out your offerings.

And if you're already equipped to welcome song birds back, it's time to clean feeders and diversify:

• Hang hummingbird feeders in April or May, and orange halves to attract orioles.

• Remove last year’s nests from nest boxes, install new ones as needed and provide short lengths of string, wool and other materials for nest-building.

• Plan your plantings. Native species provide the best year-round shelter and food resources.

The National Wildlife Federation ( also offers some great advice on reinforcing or establishing a songbird-friendly yard: birds often seek protected places to roost or sleep. Dense vegetation found in thickets or the interior branches of evergreens serve as a windbreak and conceal the birds from night-prowling predators.

In winter, a few species of songbirds—the ones that nest in tree cavities or birdhouses in spring—will also use roost boxes to stay warm. Among them: bluebirds, chickadees, titmice, screech owls and some woodpeckers.

In Part 2 of this segment, we'll focus on other environmental factors to keep songbirds thriving on your property.

Published with permission from RISMedia.