RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Resolutions Every Homeowner Should Consider in 2018

December 20, 2017 2:09 am

The time for New Year's resolutions is at hand. And while some are striving to eat healthier and get more exercise in 2018, there are a few resolutions everyone can make to help keep their home more safe, secure, and more efficient.

The folks at have a ton of ideas for homeowner resolutions, but among the most valuable is the suggestion to call for an energy audit. This entails inviting a specialist in to perform a series of tests that tell you the efficiency of your heating and cooling system and the overall efficiency of your home.

On the basis of the test results, auditors will likely recommend low-cost improvements to save energy, and larger upgrades that will pay you back within five to seven years. Audits take two to three hours and cost $250 to $400, but many utility companies or local and state energy offices could offer a substantial rebate.

More than a few real estate blogs urge homeowners to resolve to find a way to make extra payments on your mortgage. While paying even as little as $25 - $100 more per month may seem like it could have little impact, sources say it makes a huge difference on the total you end up paying over the course of the loan. It can also shorten the amount of time you're making payments and can have you owning your house free and clear sooner than you expected.

If you want to save more and waste less in 2018, the Natural Resources Defense Council - an organization that pushes for more intelligent management of natural resources - suggests making a resolution to stop wasting food. In 2017, Americans on average tossed out roughly 40 percent of their food.

That one behavior modification could save you roughly $1,300 per household per year - quite a chunk of change. The council suggests planning out grocery shopping, meals and other elements of consumption to bring your household into the zero-food-waste category in 2018.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Holiday Safety for your Pets

December 20, 2017 2:09 am

Holidays should be enjoyable for the whole family - your four-legged members included. But with potentially dangerous decorations, a flurry of guests and tables teeming with temptations, your furry friends may need a little added care this season. Below are a few holiday tips from Petland to make the holidays more enjoyable for families and their pets, especially those living in geographical locations where cold weather is an added concern:

No rich foods. Refrain from feeding your pet holiday table scraps. Your pet's digestive system is not receptive to rich people foods. Also make sure to keep grapes, raisins and currants (in fruitcakes) out of your pet's reach, as these are toxic to dogs and cats.

Holiday decorations out of reach of paws. When not crated, your pets should be observed often over the holidays, making sure they are not endangering themselves by chewing on Christmas paraphernalia, gifts and ribbons. Also beware of snow globes and bubble lights as the liquids inside can be toxic. Keep potpourri out of reach as well, as the smells can also be enticing to your four-legged friends.

Oh, Christmas Tree. Make sure your tree is secure, in a corner is best, especially if you have felines in your family! Keep the area around the tree clean and free from pine needles. The needles are sharp and can puncture your pet's intestinal tract if ingested. Be careful with glass bulbs, lights, tinsel and wires – these can also be harmful. Also, try to avoid popcorn or cranberry strands on the tree as they may prove tempting for your pet!

Dangerous holiday foliage. Keep pets from coming in contact with holiday plants – mistletoe, holly, and poinsettia. These traditional holiday plants can cause illness. Ingestion of these plants can be toxic to some animals. On contact with these plants, some pets may develop an irritating rash.

Rap on the car hood. A warm automobile is a hotel for outdoor cats during the winter months. Every year thousands of cats who take comfort in sleeping under the hood are injured or killed when a driver returns to his car and starts the engine. A rap on the car hood before starting the engine will awaken a sleeping cat, giving it time to escape before you rev up and go.

Keep antifreeze out of reach. This is the time of year when antifreeze is used, so be sure to store it safely out of reach. Antifreeze can smell good to pets, but it is highly toxic.

Give water not ice. Pets who live outdoors during the winter must have fresh water to drink at all times. Water, however, can freeze in a matter of hours when temperatures go below freezing. Pet owners who can not replenish their pet's dish with fresh water several times a day may need to use an electrically heated water dish.

Provide proper shelter. Having a permanent fur coat does not make your pets safe from winter's harsh blows. Cats and dogs that live outdoors must have a shelter equipped with clean, dry bedding. The shelter should be just big enough for the pet to get in and turn around. Having a larger cat or dog house is not beneficial, as the animal cannot use its natural body heat to warm the shelter area. Even pet birds housed inside need to have their cages located in places free of feather-chilling drafts.

Dry those paws. The snow and salt that accumulates in your pet's paws from daily winter romps can result in irritation, cracking and pain. Paws need to be checked daily and routinely cleaned and dried. A balm can be helpful in keeping your pet's paws soft. Your pet's coat should be dried off, too, as dampness and chilling can lead to illness.

Quell anxiety. If your pet gets anxious around extra people in the house, consider a stress-relieving oil warmer or drops to help calm your pooch. A Thundershirt or compression jacket may also be beneficial. Make sure your pet always has a quiet place to rest during noisy holiday activities.

Source: Petland

Published with permission from RISMedia.