RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Seniors: 10 Ways to Avoid ID Theft

October 14, 2015 2:15 am

Identity fraud involving elderly individuals is not uncommon – in fact, older persons are often targeted specifically by identity thieves seeking financial gain. To protect yourself, your parents or loved ones from identity theft, follow these 10 tips recommended by Experian.

1. Always shred or destroy documents that contain personal information before throwing them away. 

2. Never respond to cold phone calls or e-mails asking for account details, PINs, passwords or personal information.

3. Don’t give too much away on networking websites. For example, pets’ names or children’s names could be used as passwords.

4. Register to vote at your current address. If you don’t, thieves could use your previous address details to open new credit accounts and run up debt in your name.

5. Monitor your mail regularly so you know when to expect important documents — and when to act if they don’t arrive. 

6. If you move to a new home, redirect your mail through the postal service.

7. Always use secure, unique passwords for as many online accounts as possible. At the very least, have a unique password for each type of service provider, such as financial services, retail services and email. 

8. Don’t store account names and passwords on your smartphone, either in email, as a note, or to auto-complete when you open a website or app. It will be a goldmine for fraudsters if your device is lost or stolen. 

9. Read all bank and card statements regularly to check for suspicious transactions. 

10. Check your credit report regularly for suspicious applications and spending.

Source: Experian

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The Danger of Lead-Based Paint

October 14, 2015 2:15 am

Though the federal government banned residential use of lead-based paint in 1978, it remains on the walls of about 40 percent of the housing stock today. For children, older homes are considered to be the most hazardous source of lead, and exposure can result in lead poisoning, a serious health concern.

"Awareness is the key to eradicating lead poisoning," says Angie Hicks, founder of Angie’s List. "The more homeowners know, the more likely they are to demand and be willing to pay what it takes to remodel and repair without endangering their children."

Any project that disturbs old paint – such as prep work for re-painting, remodeling or window installation – can create dust and debris that a child may inhale or ingest. Since 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has required contractors whose work disturbs lead paint to be trained and certified in proper safety techniques.

"Of course do-it-yourself projects present the same dangers, so handy homeowners should be following best practices, too," Hicks adds. "This isn't rocket science. It's smart, common sense actions that anyone can do – and all of us who deal with older homes should want to do."

To learn more about residential lead, visit EPA.gov.

Source: Angie’s List

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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