RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Installing a Standby Generator? 5 Questions to Ask

November 24, 2015 1:12 am

Standby generators, backup electrical systems that automatically operate after a power outage, can aid homeowners tremendously in the wake of a severe storm. Considering installing a standby generator in your home? Consult a professional dealer first—and ask them these five questions before purchasing—say the experts at Briggs & Stratton.

1. What size generator is right for my home?
The best generator size for a home depends on what the homeowner is hoping to power when the utility power is knocked offline. Generator sizing calculators, like the one at www.powernow.com, can help give homeowners an idea of the best size for their home before meeting with the installer.

2. Where should the standby generator be installed?
A homeowner's dealer will help determine where on the property the generator's placement will be, and whether any custom installation work will need to be done. That could include burying wires underground or adding a concrete pad on which the standby generator will be installed.

3. What installation and permit requirements does the home need prior to installation?
To start the home generator installation process, your local dealer will conduct an on-site visit to determine your home's specific installation needs and what local permits are needed before starting.

4. What kind of fuel do standby generators run on?
The dealer will also discuss which fuel option—natural gas or liquid propane—is available and will work best for your home's generator system. In almost all instances, the generator will use the fuel option that is already being used in the home.

5. What financing options are available?
Financing deals like zero monthly interest or low APR and fixed monthly payments are available through the dealer from the manufacturer. This gives homeowners immediate access to backup power without needing to save to make a larger one-time payment. The installer will know the latest financing options available for the unit being purchased.

Source: Briggs & Stratton

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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6 Safety Tips to Remember This Thanksgiving

November 24, 2015 1:12 am

Whether your home is playing host on Thanksgiving or you’re gathering elsewhere with family and friends, safety hazards do exist. The most common risk? Fire, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). In fact, three times as many home cooking fires occur on Thanksgiving than on a typical day.

“A combination of factors collectively increases the risk of home cooking fires on Thanksgiving,” says Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of Outreach and Advocacy. “People are often preparing multiple dishes with lots of guests and other distractions, which can make it all too easy to forget what’s on the stove. That’s when cooking mishaps are most likely to occur. A little added awareness about potential fire hazards and taking a few basic precautions in the kitchen can go a long way toward keeping your Thanksgiving fire-free.”

Those precautions include the following:

1. Remain in the kitchen while you’re cooking, and keep a close eye on what you fry! Always stay in the kitchen while frying, grilling or broiling food. If you have to leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove. Regularly check on food that’s simmering, baking or roasting, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.

2. Keep items that can catch fire, such as oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels and curtains away from the cooking area.

3. Be alert when cooking. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

4. Double up on disposable aluminum pans if using to cook a turkey. This will help avoid puncture and dripping liquid, which can cause an oven fire.

5. Avoid using a turkey fryer. The use of turkey fryers can potentially lead to devastating burns and other injuries and the destruction of property due to the large amount (and high temperature) of oil used. If you prefer a fried turkey, look for grocery stores, specialty food retailers and restaurants that sell deep-fried turkeys.

6. If necessary, smother small fires with a lid. If you have a small (grease) cooking fire on the stovetop and decide to fight the fire, smother the flames by sliding a lid over the pan and turning off the burner. Leave the pan covered until it is completely cooled. For an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed.

Source: NFPA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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