RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Don't Let Pumpkin Pulp Wreak Halloween Havoc

October 29, 2015 12:51 am

Every year, over a billion pounds of pumpkins are produced in America—many of which are carved into jack-o’-lanterns each Halloween. That’s a lot of leftover pulp! If you’re planning to carve a pumpkin this year, keep in mind pulp can damage your kitchen disposal and other plumbing fixtures if not properly discarded.

“People think that it’s safe for disposals because it’s soft, stringy and mushy,” says Larry Rothman, plumbing director for Roto-Rooter Plumbing and Drain Service. “The problem is that pulp will dry and harden, choking off drain pipes and garbage disposals and creating all sorts of havoc.

“The toilet is not a better option,” Rothman adds. “It just means the clog forms deeper into the pipe."

To prevent Halloween drain disasters, carve pumpkins on a bed of newspaper. When you’re finished, wrap up the mess and throw all pumpkin-related materials into the garbage can or a compost pile. The seeds can be separated and roasted for a tasty treat, or they can be air-dried and planted in the spring after the last frost to grow next year's Halloween pumpkin.

Source: Roto-Rooter

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Cozying Up with a Portable Heater? 12 Safety Tips

October 29, 2015 12:51 am

Keeping warm with a portable heater this season? Be cautious when doing so—improper use can result in house fire or worse. According to experts of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM), portable heaters should always be used according to the manufacturers’ instructions.

“Most fires are preventable by following the simple and important safety tips offered by AHAM, such as giving portable heaters at least three feet of space on all sides,” says Lt. Anthony Mancuso, director of the FDNY’s Fire Safety Education Unit.

If you plan to use a portable heater, AHAM advises the following safety tips.

1. Read the manufacturer’s instructions and warning labels before using your portable electric heater.

2. Do not leave an operating heater unattended and always unplug heater when not in use.

3. Do not use your heater with a power strip or extension cord. Overheating of a power strip or extension cord could result in a fire.

4. String out cords on top of area rugs or carpeting. Placing anything, including furniture, on top of the cord may damage it.

5. Keep combustible materials, such as furniture, pillows, bedding, papers, clothes and curtains at least three feet from the front of the heater and away from the sides and rear. Do not block heater’s air intake or outlet.

6. Keep flammable materials, such as paint, gas cans and matches, away from the heater.

7. Unless the heater is designed for outdoor use or in bathrooms, do not use in damp or wet areas. Parts in the heater may be damaged by moisture.

8. Check periodically for a secure plug to outlet fit. If the plug does not fit snugly into the outlet or if the plug becomes very hot, the outlet may need to be replaced. Check with a qualified electrician to replace the outlet.

9. Unplug the heater when not in use by pulling the plug straight out from the outlet. Inspect the heater’s cord periodically. Do not use a heater with a damaged cord.

10. Do not plug any other electrical device into the same outlet as your heater. This could result in overheating.

11. Heaters should be kept away from children and not be placed in a child’s room without supervision.

12. Place heater on a level, flat surface. Only use heater on table tops when specified by the manufacturer. Do not place your heater on furniture. It could fall, dislodging or breaking parts in the heater.

Source: AHAM

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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