RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Is Your Roof Reindeer-Ready?

December 10, 2015 1:51 am

The holidays are fast approaching! Amid the gift-giving, gathering with loved ones and decorating, the season serves as an important reminder for homeowners to make their roofs “reindeer-ready,” or review their roofs.

To do that, the experts at the Metal Roofing Alliance advise completing the following 10 checks, which can be done without a ladder:

1. For homes with asphalt shingles, look for black areas indicating cracking shingles.

2. For homes with shake or shingles, look for pieces that are curled upward, split, broken off or missing.

3. For homes with slate roofs, look for black areas that indicate slate is missing.

4. Look for heavy wear around the valleys, the areas where water runs off the roof into the gutters.

5. Look at the materials around the chimney and vent pipes and check for cracks, gaps and missing or fractured caulking.

6. Check eave overhangs for water damage.

7. Use binoculars to check around the chimney, trim and other flashings for signs of cracks, shingles that are coming up off the roof and general wear.

8. Conduct an interior inspection for stained or discolored ceilings, which most likely indicates roof problems.

9. Check your gutters for asphalt shingle granules.  Lots of granules mean less coverage on your roof. 

10. Remove branches, twigs and leaves from gutters and clear out down spouts to allow for snow and ice run off.

Source: Metal Roofing Alliance

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Caregivers: 5 Signs of Declining Financial Capability

December 9, 2015 1:51 am

(Family Features)—If you've been entrusted to assist an elderly relative, you may struggle with knowing when it's time to take on a greater role. It is likely that at some point your loved ones' financial capability will be challenged as they age, making it more difficult to competently handle money-related matters on their own.

To best gauge their level of need, Ted Beck, president and CEO of the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE), recommends watching for the following signs:

1. Is the aging person taking longer to complete financial tasks? Does he or she struggle with everyday efforts like preparing bills for mailing, reconciling bank statements or organizing paperwork?

2. Is the person missing key details in financial documents? Are bills piling up and has he or she missed a payment? Is he or she able to prioritize his or her regular responsibilities?

3. Is your aging relative experiencing problems with everyday arithmetic? Maybe you recently went out to dinner with mom and dad, and while paying, they took an inordinate amount of time to calculate the appropriate tip.

4. Have you noticed a decreased understanding of financial concepts with your loved ones? Are they having increased difficulty comprehending health care matters like deductibles, or are they having a hard time understanding the bank statements they receive?

5. Are they having new difficulty identifying investment risks? Are they able to minimize the risks in potential investments? Did they recently fall victim to fraud or a scam because they could not spot the liabilities?

For both parties, approaching these discussions with candor and an open mind is critical, adds Beck.

"Especially if you're accustomed to handling money matters privately, learning to talk more candidly about your finances may be uncomfortable," says Beck. "However, allowing trusted individuals to take a closer look at your accounts can help you establish a realistic plan for the future, and help flag any potential concerns."

Source: NEFE

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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